2023 GDS Index: Operational GDSs [WIP, 26 April 2024]

The GDSs are each ranked by ‘all [[XXX]]’, ‘by department’ and ‘by sector’.

Note on arranging the table: To arrange GDSs in order of rank out of [[XXX]], please place your cursor on the header of the column titled “Rank out of 221” and click. Click once to order by ascending (1-[[XXX]]) and twice to order by descending ([[XXX]]-1). To arrange GDSs in order of rank by department, please click once on the headers of the columns titled “Rank out of Department” and “Government Department”. To arrange GDSs in order of rank by sector, please click once on the headers of the columns titled “Rank out of Sector” and “Sector”. Please also be aware you can scroll to the right.

Learn more about the methodology in Working Paper [[XXXX/XX – Methodology paper]]. See Working Papers to view or download.

In addition to those GDSs in operation, view a list of all archived GDSs (archived on or before 31 December 2023), with PDFs.

Please scroll to the right on the table to see additional information (purpose, strategy, ranks, internal/external).

 

GDSs in operation as at 31 December 2023 [#300] [ACTIVE]

GDS NumberIndex when GDS was added (2014, 2015, 2018, 2020, 2021, 2023?)DepartmentGovernment Department Strategy (GDS)SectorPublication dateDurationNumber of pagesSigned by (general)This GDS replaces
Transferred fromStrategy map9. LegislationPurposeStrategyRank out of [[XXX]]Rank out of DepartmentRank out of SectorExternal/Internal
GDS02–012014 GDS Index02. Department of Conservation Subantarctic Islands Research StrategyEnvironment SectorMay, 20052005–NK39Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[M]aintaining or improving the condition of these islands by continuing with the programme of eradication of all introduced mammal species.’ (p. 5)The approach is to set guidelines for researchers desiring access to Southland Conservancy and to provide a tool for managers to decide on the appropriate research needed for each of the four research themes: natural ecosystems; effects of introduced biota; human impacts and social interaction; and abiotic sciences (sciences such as geology which study non-living systems). (pp. 18–27)External
GDS02–032018 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationMātauranga Whakauka Taiao – Environmental Education for Sustainability (jointly held between DOC and MfE) Environment SectorJuly, 20172017–202136Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 15Not applicable‘All New Zealanders value a connection to our environment by actively working together for a sustainable future.’ (p. 7)The approach is to focus on three priority areas and implement an Environmental Education for Sustainability (EEfS) strategy to ensure Aotearoa New Zealand’s environment remains healthy and sustainable in the future. (p. 7)External
GDS02–042020 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationNew Zealand sea lion/rāpoka Threat Management Plan 2017–2022 (jointly held between DOC and MPI)
Environment SectorJuly, 20172017–202219Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 13–14Not applicable‘[P]romote the recovery and ensure the long-term viability of New Zealand sea lions, with the ultimate goal of achieving “Not Threatened” status.’ (p. 4)The approach is to focus on four work streams: engagement (including the establishment of a New Zealand sea lion/rāpoka forum, advisory group, and community liaison role within DOC), direct mitigation, targeted research (such as research to better understand adult female nutritional stress and diet), and evaluation (such as conducting annual pup counts and tag re- sighting on the Auckland Islands). (pp. 15–16)External
GDS02–052018 GDS Index02. Department of Conservation National Compliance Strategy 2017–2020 Environment SectorAugust, 20172017–202013Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘To effectively administer [existing] legislation ... This Strategy sets out DOC’s approach to its compliance and law enforcement function.’ (p. 4)The approach is to identify, deal with and prosecute non-compliance with a set of nine principles, such as transparency and consistency. (pp. 5–7)External
GDS02–062020 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationGovernment Tourism Strategy (jointly held between DOC and MBIE) Environment SectorMay, 20192019–202022Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 5Not applicable‘[S]ustainable tourism growth.’ (p. 5)The approach is to use government-led initiatives to support 17 specific workstreams across five outcomes: the economy, the environment, international and domestic visitors, New Zealanders and our communities, and regions. (pp. 7–8, 12–16)External
GDS02–072020 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationPredator Free 2050 StrategyEnvironment SectorFebruary, 20202020–205044Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Return the voices of the insects, bats, reptiles and birds back to the forests, farmland, towns, cities and coasts.’ (p. 9)The approach is to eradicate mustelids, rats and possums through six interconnected pathways: whānau, hapū and iwi expressing kaitiakitanga; communities taking action; supporting the kaupapa through legislation and policy; advancing our knowledge, innovation and improvement; measuring and assessing the difference we make; and moving from sustained predator control to eradication. (p. 17)External
GDS02–082021 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationVisitor Centre Strategy 2020–2025Environment SectorFebruary, 20202020–202523Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicableTo create ‘a clear visitor centre system ... ensuring a good visitor experience’. (p. 2)The approach is to improve visitor experience and enhance DOC’s reputation by supporting visitors to have a safe and enjoyable experience on public conservation land, developing an effective visitor information system, and providing quality experience through visitor centres. (pp. 11, 14–15)External
GDS02–092020 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationNational Plan of Action – Seabirds 2020 (jointly held between DOC and MPI)Environment SectorMay, 20202020–202524Not signedNational plan of action –
Seabirds (2013)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[W]ork towards zero fishing-related seabird mortalities.’ (p. 2)The approach is to avoid bycatch, maintain healthy seabird populations, undertake research to manage direct effects of fisheries on seabirds, and actively engage internationally to promote measures and practices that reduce impacts on New Zealand seabirds. (p. 12)External
GDS02–102020 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationTe Kaweka Takohaka mō te Hoiho 2019–2029 (jointly held between DOC and MPI)Environment SectorAugust, 20202019–202932Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Hoiho should be able to go to sea to feed on abundant and good quality kai, and return safely to the whenua to breed, feed their young and socialise without facing human-induced threats.’ (p. 12)The approach is to focus on sustaining and restoring the health of the hoiho population by applying six principles to 20 strategic priorities, such as ensuring that accurate, usable and accessible data contributes to hoiho conservation. (pp. 19–29)External
GDS02–112020 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationTe Mana o te Taiao: Aotearoa New Zealand Biodiversity Strategy 2020Environment SectorAugust, 20202020–205073Crown onlyBiodiversity
Strategy (2000)
Not applicableYes, p. 43Not applicable‘The vision we set out for this strategy is not only for the return of health
to the natural world in a way that we can measure but also for the return of a health and vibrancy that we can feel, touch, smell and hear, as well as an emotional reconnection with nature.’ (p. 10)
The approach is to focus on three pillars: getting the system right, empowering action and protecting and restoring biodiversity. (p. 43)External
GDS02–122020 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationCritical Ecosystem Pressures on Freshwater Environments (CRESP) 4-year research strategy Environment SectorNovember, 20202020–202411Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 4Not applicable‘[T]o provide knowledge that will strengthen DOC’s advocacy and management of indigenous freshwater ecosystems and species.’ (p. 3)The approach is to conduct research in collaboration with a range of external groups on four abiotic pressures and their effects: water levels/flows; habitat loss; sediment and nutrients; and fish passage (in-stream structures that alter freshwater habitats or block fish movements upstream and/or downstream).
(p. 2)
External
GDS02–132021 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationHeritage and Visitor Strategy – He Rautaki Taonga Tuku Iho, Manuhiri Tūārangi hokiEnvironment SectorJanuary, 20212021–202529Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 13–14Not applicable‘Sustainably manage visitors to protect and enhance the value of New Zealand’s natural, cultural and historic heritage.’ (p. 6)The approach is to seek opportunities to partner with tangata whenua, improve the evidence base for decision making and service delivery, and invest in and maintain visitor experiences and facilities. (pp. 14–16)External
GDS02–152021 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationHector’s and Māui Dolphin Threat Management Plan 2020Environment SectorDecember, 20212021–NK20Not signedHector’s and Maui’s Dolphin Threat Management Plan (2007)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘The vision of the Hector’s and Māui dolphin TMP is that: New Zealand’s Hector’s and Māui dolphin populations are resilient and thriving throughout their natural range.’ (p. 4)The approach is to identify and implement unique fishing protection measures (e.g. netting and trawling) and non-fishing protection measures (e.g. sanctuaries and tourism). (pp. 7–11)External
GDS03–022018 GDS Index03. Department of CorrectionsChange Lives Shape Futures: Investing in better mental health for offendersJustice Sector
March, 20172017–201928Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 3Not applicable‘By investing in better mental health for offenders we improve their chances of changing their life and shaping a new future for themselves, their family, and our communities.’ (p. 4)The approach is to better screen and treat offenders with mental health disorders, by investing in and promoting improved services, including targeted treatment and learning programmes. (pp. 10–17)External
GDS03–032020 GDS Index03. Department of CorrectionsHōkai Rangi: Ara Poutama Aotearoa Strategy 2019–2024Justice SectorAugust, 20192019–202440Crown and Chief ExecutiveNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘This strategy ... ultimately aims to lower the proportion of Māori in
our care to a level that matches the Māori share of the general population.’ (p. 4)
The approach is to focus on the wellbeing of people who come into the department’s care by facilitating kaupapa Māori-based pathways and practices, including rehabilitation and whānau support. (pp. 16–17)External
GDS03–042021 GDS Index03. Department of CorrectionsOur Alcohol and Other Drug Strategy – Ara Poutama Aotearoa Strategy 2021–2026Justice Sector
October, 20212021–202616Crown and Chief ExecutiveOur Drug and Alcohol Strategy Through to 2020 (2016)Not applicableNot foundRequired (see Corrections Act 2004, s 123) and cited in the GDS‘We will contribute
to enhanced self- management, healthier lifestyle choices and protective factors such as participation in Te Ao Māori that will benefit individuals, whānau and communities.’ (p. 8)
The approach is to implement a whānau-centred approach with four workstreams. This includes establishing an alcohol and other drug governance group of external and internal stakeholders. (pp. 12–13)External
GDS03–052021 GDS Index03. Department of CorrectionsWāhine – E rere ana ki te pae hou: Women’s Strategy 2021–2025Justice Sector
October, 20212021–202524Crown and Chief ExecutiveWahine - E rere ana ki te Pae Hou – Women’s Strategy (2017)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[H]elp break the cycle of reoffending and improve the wellbeing and safety of women, their whānau, and our wider communities
as well as contribute to intergenerational transformation.’ (p. 8)
The approach is to implement an action plan that focuses on eight key areas: transitioning through the prison system; ensuring safe
and humanised treatment while in prison; improving prison environments; improving the health and wellbeing of women; working with whānau to strengthen relationships; improving staff training and recruitment; monitoring the outcomes for effectiveness; and implementing a more effective assurance framework. (pp. 20–23)
External
GDS04–012018 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsTe Huri Mōhiotanga Hei Uara: Nga Tohutohu Rautaki Ki 2030 – Turning Knowledge into Value: Strategic Directions to 2030
Finance and Government Administration SectorDecember, 20162016–20308Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[C]reate cultural
and economic value
for New Zealanders through leadership
and collaboration. We will remove barriers to knowledge, ensure
New Zealanders have the skills to create knowledge and preserve knowledge for future generations.’ (p. 2)
The approach is to work with iwi, partners and stakeholders, by developing a culture of research and innovation, to improve access to knowledge, reading comprehension and awareness of diverse perspectives. (p. 7)Internal
GDS04–022018 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsArchives 2057 Strategy
Finance and Government Administration SectorMay, 20172017–205716Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘We will be a trusted regulator of government information through
the Public Records Act; experts in how to create, manage, preserve and discover information;
and a gateway providing access to the nation’s history, connecting people to their stories, rights and entitlements.’ (p. 4)
The approach is to develop three key strategic areas within Archives New Zealand: increasing transparency; creating effective and integrated systems; and making people more aware of archives’ relevance. (p. 3)External
GDS04–032021 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsDigital Inclusion Blueprint – Te Mahere mō te Whakaurunga MatihikoFinance and Government Administration SectorMarch, 20192019–202424Crown and otherNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]hat all of us have what we need to participate in, contribute to, and benefit from the digital world.’ (p. 6)The approach is to identify priority areas and gaps, test small-scale interventions, and then review digital inclusion goals and priorities and check they are still relevant. (p. 16)External
GDS04–052020 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsOffice of Ethnic Communities – Strategic Framework 2020Finance and Government Administration SectorJanuary, 20202020–NK1Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Communities are welcoming and inclusive, diversity is valued, and all people participate in and contribute fully to society.’ (p. 1)The approach is to develop and build on measures and processes in three interconnected areas: promoting positive relationships and trust with ethnic communities, creating better government-led outcomes, and ensuring positive attitudes and dialogue in wider society. (p. 1)External
GDS04–062020 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsStrategy for a Digital Public ServiceFinance and Government Administration SectorMarch, 20202020–NK40Crown and otherNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘The public service is modern at its heart and all New Zealanders are thriving in a digital age.’ (p. iii)The approach is to focus on eight behaviours that will help transform the public service to be fit for the digital age, such as acting as a unified public service and making people-centred decisions. (p. 18)Internal
GDS04–082021 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsRegulatory Services Group Strategy 2021–2026Finance and Government Administration SectorJuly, 20212021–202642Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 4Not applicable‘RSG is at the forefront of regulatory excellence.’ (p. 11)The approach is to focus on embedding regulatory foundations, strengthening capability, aligning culture and purpose, harnessing evidence, insights and evaluation, and maximising relationships. (p. 4)External
GDS04–092021 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsCharities Services Research Strategy 2020–2023Finance and Government Administration SectorMarch, 20212020–20231Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[S]timulate and promote research into any matter relating to charities.’ (p. 1)The approach is to improve the quality and accessibility of data on the Charities Register and increase the level of collaboration across the research sector. (p. 1)Internal
GDS05–012020 GDS Index05. Department of the Prime Minister and CabinetNational Disaster Resilience Strategy – Rautaki ā-Motu Manawaroa AituāFinance and Government Administration Sector
April, 20192019–202952Crown onlyNational Civil Defence
Emergency Management
Strategy (2008)
Not applicableYes, p. 3Required (see Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) Act 2002, s 31) and cited in the GDS‘New Zealand is a disaster resilient nation that acts proactively to manage risks and build resilience in a way that contributes to the wellbeing and prosperity of all
New Zealanders.’ (p. 3)
The approach is to implement a package of initiatives to manage risks, improve rapid response services, and integrate and support community perspectives. Examples include implementing emergency management system reforms to improve how New Zealand responds to natural disasters and emergencies, and improving local government planning, including long term plans, annual plans and asset management plans. (p. 34)External
GDS05–022020 GDS Index05. Department of the Prime Minister and CabinetCyber Security Strategy 2019Finance and Government Administration Sector
July, 20192019–202317Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘This strategy has a vision that New Zealand is confident and secure in the digital world – it is about enabling New Zealand to thrive online.’ (p. 8)The approach is to help citizens and workers become more security aware, develop better international partnerships and cooperation at policy and operational levels, and together proactively tackle cybercrime. (pp. 10, 13)External
GDS05–032020 GDS Index05. Department of the Prime Minister and CabinetChild and Youth Wellbeing Strategy 2019Finance and Government Administration Sector
August, 20192019–NK92Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundRequired (see Children’s Act 2014, s 4 and s 6) and cited in the GDS‘[T]hat New Zealand be the best place in the world for children and young people.’ (p. 3)The approach includes a package of initiatives such as free and universal access to many core health and education services and extra funding/staffing to help core services to better meet the needs of children and young people from disadvantaged families and communities. (p. 62)External
GDS05–052021 GDS Index05. Department of the Prime Minister and CabinetNational Fuel Plan (jointly held between DPMC and MBIE)Finance and Government Administration Sector
March, 20202020–NK70Department staff (other than CE) onlyOil Emergency Response Strategy (2008)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[M]inimise the effects of a fuel supply disruption on New Zealand, whatever the cause.’ (p. 2)The approach is to agree communication and coordination arrangements, and regional fuel supply arrangements, between government agencies, Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) groups and fuel sector organisations. (p. 2)External
GDS06–012020 GDS Index06. Education Review OfficePacific Strategy: Driving success for Pacific learners 2019–2022Education and Workforce SectorApril, 20192019–20228Not signedPacific Strategy
(2013–2017)
Not applicableYes, p. 5Not applicable‘[E]very child achieves success as a lifelong learner.’ (p. 2)The approach is to focus on five strategic goals for improving educational outcomes for Pacific learners, including measures, partnerships, and targeted, Pacific-focused programmes. (p. 4)External
GDS07–012021 GDS Index07. Government Communications Security BureauDiversity and Inclusion Strategy 2021–2025 (jointly held between GCSB and NZSIS)Finance and Government Administration SectorJuly, 20212021–202519Chief Executive onlyDiversity and Inclusion Strategy 2017–2020 (2018)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Our workforce and work environment reflects the diversity of New Zealand, where our collective diversity is celebrated and embraced.’ (p. 6)The approach is to focus on increasing diversity in recruitment and the workforce, particularly in senior leadership positions, to ensure the environment is inclusive and diverse. (pp. 16–19)Internal
GDS09–012015 GDS Index09. Land Information New ZealandCadastre 2034Primary SectorFebruary, 20142014–203444Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘A cadastral system that enables people to readily and confidently identify the location and extent of all rights, restrictions, and responsibilities related to land and real property.’ (p. 25)The approach is to implement 23 actions, including developing principles and a coherent policy direction and framework for defining the spatial extents of all land and real property- related rights, restrictions and responsibilities. (pp. 36–38)External
GDS09–022018 GDS Index09. Land Information New ZealandPositioning Strategy 2014Primary SectorMay, 20142014–202418Department staff (other than CE) onlyGeodetic Strategy (2003)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘This strategy sets a vision of [a]ccurately positioning New Zealand for the future’. (p. 7)The approach is to achieve five ten-year goals in the geospatial context and enable accurate positioning and improved access for users, by adopting innovative technologies and capabilities. (p. 7)External
GDS09–062020 GDS Index09. Land Information New ZealandRegulatory Stewardship StrategyPrimary SectorAugust, 20182018–202028Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[E]nable New Zealanders to enjoy access to our public land, benefit from private land ownership, and be sure that overseas investment in New Zealand’s sensitive assets brings benefits to New Zealand.’ (p. 3)The approach is to manage four regulatory systems (property rights, property information, Crown land and overseas investment) through improving performance delivery, whilst mitigating regulatory underperformance or failure. (p. 7)External
GDS09–072021 GDS Index09. Land Information New ZealandAntarctic and Southern Ocean Research Directions and Priorities 2021–2030 (jointly held between LINZ, MPI, MBIE and MFAT)Primary SectorDecember, 20212021–203020Crown onlyAntarctic and Southern
Ocean Science (2011)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Excellent and impactful science that addresses the urgent need to understand the role of Antarctica
and the Southern Ocean in a globally-connected and rapidly changing environment and supports Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to protecting Antarctica and the Southern Ocean.’ (p. 2)
The approach is to focus on four priority research directions: sea-level rise; connections between the cryosphere (frozen water), ocean and atmosphere; ecosystem dynamics; and protection of Antarctic and Southern Ocean environments. (p. 2)External
GDS12–012014 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesBiosecurity Science Strategy for New Zealand – Mahere Rautaki Putaiao WhakamaruPrimary SectorOctober, 20072007–203273Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[C]ontributing to keeping New Zealanders, the plants and animals we value and our unique natural environment, safe and secure from damaging pests and disease.’ (p. 8)The approach is to establish three sectoral advisory groups to interpret the goals of Biosecurity New Zealand and make science priority recommendations to the science advisory committee, to forward to the Minister of Biosecurity. (p. 17)External
GDS12–022014 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary Industries Harvest Strategy Standard for New Zealand Fisheries Primary Sector
October, 20082008–NK30Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[P]rovide a consistent and transparent framework for setting fishery and stock targets and limits and associated fisheries management measures, so that there is a high probability of achieving targets, a very low probability of breaching limits, and acceptable probabilities of rebuilding stocks that nevertheless become depleted, in a timely manner.’ (p. 7)The approach is to focus on three core elements: a specified target about which a fishery or stock should fluctuate; a soft limit that triggers a requirement for a formal, time- constrained rebuilding plan; and a hard limit below which fisheries should be considered for closure. (pp. 7–9)External
GDS12–032018 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesResearch and Science Information Standard for New Zealand FisheriesPrimary Sector
May, 20112011–203036Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[S]takeholders and the public can be confident in the research and science information used to inform fisheries management decisions.’ (p. 1)The approach is to ensure science information is of sufficient quality to make fisheries management decisions, by applying five key principles to all information prior to use (peer review, relevance, integrity, objectivity and reliability). (p. 6)External
GDS12–042018 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesAquaculture Strategy and Five-year Action Plan to Support AquaculturePrimary SectorApril, 20122012–20174Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 3Not applicable‘[W]ell-planned and sustainable aquaculture growth in New Zealand ... enabling industry
to achieve its goal of
$1 billion in annual sales by 2025.’ (p. 2)
The approach is to focus on a number of actions including aligning government resources, working alongside stakeholders and making decisions using the best available and credible biological, economic, social and cultural information from a range of sources. (p. 2)External
GDS12–052018 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesAnimal Welfare MattersPrimary Sector
May, 20132013–NK11Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 2Not applicable‘[E]veryone taking responsibility for the welfare of animals.’ (p. 7)The approach is to focus on better planning to prevent animal welfare problems; better animal husbandry, science and technology; clearer expectations and sanctions; and measuring animal welfare performance. (p. 2)External
GDS12–062020 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesNational Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of SharksPrimary SectorJanuary, 20142013–201836Crown onlyNational Plan of Action -
Sharks (2008)
Not applicableYes, p. 6Not applicable‘To maintain the biodiversity and the long-term viability
of all New Zealand shark populations by recognising their role in marine ecosystems, ensuring that any utilisation of sharks is sustainable, and [that New Zealand is recognised for] efforts in shark conservation and management.’ (p. 2)
The approach is to focus on six goals and puts in place a number of five-year objectives for each goal. The goals are biodiversity and long-term viability of shark populations; utilisation, waste reduction and the elimination of shark finning; domestic engagement and partnerships; non- fishing threats; international engagement; and research and information. (pp. 3–4)External
GDS12–072018 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesScience Strategy – Rautaki PutaiaoPrimary Sector
October, 20152015–202034Chief Executive and other department staffNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 8Not applicable‘Policy, regulation-setting, and decision-making must be based on robust, fit-for- purpose, up to date and comprehensive science and science evidence to be effective and credible.’ (p. 5)The approach is to focus on seven priorities: smart regulation; operational excellence; international access; provenance and traceability; precision production and investment; enduring relationships; and integrated information, insight and knowledge. (p. 19)External
GDS12–082018 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesBiosecurity 2025 Direction Statement
Primary SectorNovember, 20162016–202532Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘The biosecurity system protects New Zealanders, our way of life, our natural and productive resources and our biodiversity from the harmful effects of pests and diseases.’ (p. 4)The approach is a range of actions fitting under five strategic directions, and includes establishing national data standards and procedures to support sharing of organism information, and undertaking a review of biosecurity system governance. (pp. 26–27)External
GDS12–092018 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesPrimary Sector Science Roadmap – Te Ao Tūroa Primary SectorJune, 20172017–203060Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Science and technology accelerates innovation and growth for intergenerational economic and environmental sustainability of the primary sector, leading to increased wellbeing for all New Zealanders.’ (p. 9)The approach is to focus on eight priority areas: adding value, harnessing the value and power
of data, innovating with advanced technology, innovating through genetics, innovating through Kaupapa Māori, protecting and sustaining resources, deriving value from complex systems, and integrating people and values. (p. 21)
External
GDS12–102020 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesNew Zealand sea lion/rāpoka Threat Management Plan 2017–2022 (jointly held between DOC and MPI)Primary SectorJuly, 20172017–202219Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 13–14Not applicable‘[P]romote the recovery and ensure the long-term viability of New Zealand sea lions, with the ultimate goal of achieving “Not Threatened” status.’ (p. 4)The approach is to focus on four work streams: engagement (including the establishment of a New Zealand sea lion/rāpoka forum, advisory group, and community liaison role within DOC), direct mitigation, targeted research (such as research to better understand adult female nutritional stress and diet), and evaluation (such as conducting annual pup counts and tag re- sighting on the Auckland Islands). (pp. 15–16)External
GDS12–112018 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary Industries Essential Freshwater (jointly held between MPI and MfE) [[Please note: This GDS has been archived by MfE]]Primary SectorOctober, 20182018–202056Crown onlyFreshwater Reform: 2013
and Beyond (2013)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Healthy water, fairly allocated.’ (front cover)The approach is to implement a freshwater programme through six interrelated workstreams in partnership with the advisory network: at-risk catchments, National Policy Statement for Freshwater Management amendments, National Environmental Standard for Freshwater Management, Resource Management Act amendments, allocation of freshwater resources and the future framework. (p. 12)External
GDS12–122018 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesNational Blue Cod StrategyPrimary SectorDecember, 20182018–NK24Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[A]bundant and sustainable blue cod fisheries for all.’ (p. 7)The approach is to standardise rules around blue cod fishing, so they are the same nationwide, including the use of a traffic light system. (p. 9)External
GDS12–132020 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesAquaculture StrategyPrimary SectorSeptember, 20192019–203520Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 6Not applicable‘New Zealand is globally recognised as a world- leader in sustainable and innovative aquaculture management across the value chain.’ (p. 3)The approach is to maximise the value of existing farms through innovation, and then extend into high value land-based aquaculture and/or extend aquaculture into the open ocean. (pp. 4–6)External
GDS12–142020 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesFood Safety 2019–2024Primary SectorNovember, 20192019–202416Other (not Crown or department staff)Not applicableNot applicableYes, p. 2Not applicable‘It is essential both
within New Zealand and overseas that we have a dynamic and forward- thinking food safety strategy that will continue to maintain and grow our reputation as a provider of trusted and safe food.’ (p. 6)
The approach is to focus on five priority areas, which together identify 17 actions including to increase engagement with food businesses; to engage with priority stakeholders; to seek out and include consideration of mātauranga Māori (Māori knowledge), values and perspectives in regard to food safety; and to further invest in an emerging risks system and a horizon-scanning system. (pp. 8–13)External
GDS12–152021 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesCadmium and New Zealand Agriculture and HorticulturePrimary SectorDecember, 20192019–202620Not signedCadmium and New Zealand Agriculture and Horticulture (2011)Not applicableYes, p. 9Not applicable‘To ensure that cadmium in rural production poses minimal risks to health, trade, land use flexibility and the environment over the next 100 years.’ (p. 2)The approach is to manage the risk of cadmium (a naturally occurring heavy metal in soils, of which phosphate fertiliser is the primary source) through research, monitoring, education and supporting practices which enable food standards to be met and control soil cadmium accumulation. (p. 2)External
GDS12–162020 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesNational Plan of Action – Seabirds 2020 (jointly held between DOC and MPI)Primary SectorMay, 20202020–202524Not signedNational plan of action –
Seabirds (2013)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[W]ork towards zero fishing-related seabird mortalities.’ (p. 2)The approach is to avoid bycatch, maintain healthy seabird populations, undertake research to manage direct effects of fisheries on seabirds, and actively engage internationally to promote measures and practices that reduce impacts on New Zealand seabirds. (p. 12)External
GDS12–172020 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesTe Kaweka Takohaka mō te Hoiho 2019–2029 (jointly held between DOC and MPI)Primary SectorAugust, 20202019–202932Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Hoiho should be able to go to sea to feed on abundant and good quality kai, and return safely to the whenua to breed, feed their young and socialise without facing human-induced threats.’ (p. 12)The approach is to focus on sustaining and restoring the health of the hoiho population by applying six principles to 20 strategic priorities, such as ensuring that accurate, usable and accessible data contributes to hoiho conservation. (pp. 19–29)External
GDS12–182021 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesAntarctic and Southern Ocean Research Directions and Priorities 2021–2030 (jointly held between LINZ, MPI, MBIE and MFAT)Primary SectorDecember, 20212021–203020Crown onlyAntarctic and Southern
Ocean Science (2011)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Excellent and impactful science that addresses the urgent need to understand the role of Antarctica and the Southern Ocean in a globally-connected and rapidly changing environment and supports Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to protecting Antarctica and the Southern Ocean.’ (p. 2)The approach is to focus on four priority research directions: sea-level rise; connections between the cryosphere (frozen water), ocean and atmosphere; ecosystem dynamics; and protection of Antarctic and Southern Ocean environments. (p. 2)External
GDS13–012018 GDS Index13. Ministry for the Environment Urban Design ProtocolEnvironment SectorMarch, 20052005–NK40Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Making New Zealand towns and cities more successful through quality urban design.’ (p. 5)The approach is to create a national cross- sector commitment to quality urban design; provide a national resource of tools, actions and experiences; set up partnerships
between government, the private sector and professionals; and increase the awareness of quality urban design (including demonstrating its value). (p. 5)
External
GDS13–042014 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentClean Healthy Air for All New ZealandersEnvironment SectorAugust, 20112011–NK68Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[D]eliver clean healthy air for all New Zealanders.’ (p. 1)The approach is to promote a toolkit of ‘compliance activities’ to assist regional councils to meet the ambient PM10 standard; it adopts a graduated approach, with activities ranging from education, assisted compliance, advice, reporting and review through to action. (pp. 20–22)External
GDS13–052018 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentMātauranga Whakauka Taiao – Environmental Education for Sustainability (jointly held between DOC and MfE)
Environment SectorJuly, 20172017–202136Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 15Not applicable‘All New Zealanders value a connection to our environment by actively working together for a sustainable future.’ (p. 7)The approach is to focus on three priority areas and implement an Environmental Education for Sustainability (EEfS) strategy to ensure Aotearoa New Zealand’s environment remains healthy and sustainable in the future. (p. 7)External
GDS13–062018 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentOur Science Strategy – Rautaki Pūtaiao Environment Sector
May, 20182018–NK18Chief Executive and other department staffWater Research Strategy
(2009)
Not applicableYes, p. 9Not applicable‘[V]alued and trusted science for environmental stewardship.’ (p. 5)The approach is to focus on four themes (people, tools and processes, collaborations, and conversations), and, where appropriate,
to work directly with the Department Science Advisor, the Information Directorate and the Engagement and Procurement teams. (pp. 9–18)
Internal
GDS13–102021 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentTe hau mārohi ki anamata – Transitioning to a low-emissions and climate-resilient futureEnvironment SectorNovember, 20212021–205068Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 6Required (see Climate Change Response Act 2002, s 5ZG) and cited in the GDS‘[A] Long-term low- emissions development strategy ... Our main purpose is to urgently reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase carbon sinks, so that we meet our domestic emissions reduction targets.’ (cover and p. 9)The approach is to focus on system settings and sector plans. This strategy forms Part I of the first emissions reduction plan and sets the context for the first three emissions budgets (published in May 2022). These will provide detailed information about the steps Aotearoa will take to reduce emissions and increase carbon sinks in the first budget period (2022– 25). (pp. 15, 62)External
GDS15–012014 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentVision MātaurangaEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorJuly, 20072007–NK28Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘To unlock the innovation potential of Māori knowledge, resources and people to assist
New Zealanders to create a better future.’ (p. 1)
The approach is to focus on four research themes: indigenous innovation (contributing to economic growth through distinctive
research and development); taiao (achieving environmental sustainability through iwi and hapū relationships with land and sea); hauora/oranga (improving health and social wellbeing); and mātauranga (exploring indigenous knowledge and research, science and technology). (pp. 8–17)
External
GDS15–022014 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentEnergy Strategy 2011–2021Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorAugust, 20112011–202132Crown onlyNational Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy (2001), originally held by MfENot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[M]ake the most of its abundant energy potential, for the benefit of all
New Zealanders ... so that:
• The economy grows, powered by secure, competitively-priced energy and increasing energy exports.
• The environment is recognised for its importance to our
New Zealand way of life.’ (p. 4)
The approach is to prioritise four themes alongside a number of specific areas of focus: diverse resource development (e.g. develop renewable energy resources); environmental responsibility (e.g. reduce energy-related greenhouse gas emissions); efficient use of energy (e.g. warm, dry, energy efficient homes); and secure and affordable energy (e.g. oil security and transport). (p. 5)External
GDS15–032014 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentStrategy to 2040: He kai kei aku ringa – The Crown-Māori Economic Growth PartnershipEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorNovember, 20122012–204020Other (not Crown or department staff)Not applicableNot applicableYes, p. 5Not applicable‘[W]hānau, hapū, iwi and enterprises are actively seeking opportunities to sustainably develop their own resources (human and natural) to improve Māori economic
performance.’ (p. 6)
The approach is three-fold: education (Government and Māori work together to consider new models of compulsory schooling that better meet Māori needs); natural resources (Government and Māori accelerate discussions on the development of natural resources); and Māori working together to drive growth (building relationships and managing logistics in export markets, particularly China). (p. 6)External
GDS15–042014 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentRefugee Settlement: Resettlement StrategyEducation and Workforce SectorDecember, 20122012–NK12Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Refugees are participating fully and integrated socially and economically as soon as possible
so that they are living independently, undertaking the same responsibilities and exercising the same rights as other New Zealanders and have a strong sense of belonging to their own community and to New Zealand.’ (p. 3)
The approach is in stages; only the first year is outlined. This includes putting in place measures that show whether they are making progress towards five goals, working hard to ensure the right support is available for refugees before they arrive in New Zealand and placing a strong focus on employment once they arrive. (p. 9)External
GDS15–052020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentMajor Events Strategy: Investing in world class eventsEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorNK, 20132013–NK9Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘New Zealand is a world class events destination where major events generate economic, social and cultural benefits to New Zealand.’ (p. 3)The approach is for government to work in partnership with the events sector, to attract and retain major events, and generate economic, social and cultural benefits for New Zealand. (p. 6)External
GDS15–062015 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentHe Whare Āhuru He Oranga Tāngata – The Māori Housing StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorJuly, 20142014–202556Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 3, 40Not applicable‘[S]upport a future
where Māori are not disproportionately represented as social housing tenants, where Māori ... are able to exercise freedom of choice in terms of who their landlord might be, and ... have the opportunity to own their own homes, or to be working towards home ownership.’ (p. 5)
The approach is to focus on six goals: ensuring the most vulnerable Māori have secure tenure, and access to safe, quality housing with integrated support; improving the quality of housing for Māori communities; supporting Māori and their whānau to transition to preferred housing choices; increasing the amount of social housing provided by Māori organisations; increasing housing on Māori-owned land; and increasing large-scale housing developments involving Māori organisations. (pp. 6–34)External
GDS15–072015 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentNation of Curious Minds – He Whenua Hihiri I Te Mahara: A national strategic plan for science in society (jointly held between MBIE and MoE)Education and Workforce SectorJuly, 20142014–202452Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 9Not applicable‘Encourage and enable better engagement with science and technology in all sectors of New Zealand.’ (p. 9)The approach is to focus on three strategic action areas: enhancing the role of education (e.g. stronger links between STEM educators, learners, scientists and technologists); public engaging with science (e.g. encouraging high-quality science); and the science sector engaging with the public (e.g. ensuring scientists know how to make research accessible). (pp. 23–31, 38)External
GDS15–082018 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentPacific Economic Strategy 2015–2021Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
August, 20152015–202124Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 13Not applicable‘[T]o provide clear direction towards how we can support Pacific people to participate and share in New Zealand’s economic success.’ (p. 4)The approach is to focus on five priority areas: regulation of employment practices to ensure fair and safe employment environments; linking Pacific employees with employers and employer expectations; increasing the ability of Pacific providers to engage in the social housing sector; building Pacific people’s financial capability
and awareness of their consumer rights; and supporting Pacific social enterprises and businesses to be sustainable. (p. 14)
External
GDS15–092018 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentNational Statement of Science Investment 2015–2025Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
October, 20152015–202566Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 7–8Not applicable'A highly dynamic science system that enriches New Zealand, making a more visible, measurable contribution to our productivity and wellbeing through excellent science.’ (p. 7)The approach is broad (e.g. help ensure the national science challenges deliver),
but contains some detail (e.g. making the contestable fund a single, more agile and responsive fund). Note: The NSSI will be refreshed every three years to reflect progress and the funding needs of the science system. (pp. 58, 64)
External
GDS15–102018 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentEnergy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy 2017–2022Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
June, 20172017–202228Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 7Required (see Energy Efficiency and Conservation Act 2000, s 7(b)) and cited in the GDS‘[F]or New Zealand to have an energy productive and low emissions economy.’ (p. 2)The approach is to focus on business, individuals, households, community institutions, public sector agencies and cross-cutting actions (unlocking energy productivity and renewable potential across the economy). (pp. 16–21)External
GDS15–112021 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentHealth Research Strategy 2017-2027 (jointly held between MoH and MBIE)Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorJune, 20172017–202752Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 4-5Required (see Health Research Council Act 1990, s 34(2)) but not cited in the GDS‘By 2027, New Zealand will have a world-leading health research and innovation system that, through excellent research, improves the health
and wellbeing of all
New Zealanders.’ (p. 6)
The approach is to focus on four strategic priorities (and implement specific actions): invest in excellent health research; create a vibrant research environment in the health sector; build and strengthen pathways for translating research findings into policy and practice; and advance innovative ideas and commercial opportunities. (p. 10)External
GDS15–122018 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentHealth and Safety at Work Strategy 2018–2028Education and Workforce SectorDecember, 20182018–20287Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 4Required (see Health and Safety at Work Act 2015, s 195) but not cited in the GDS‘Work is healthy and
safe for everyone in
New Zealand. Everyone plays their part to manage health and safety risks effectively and proportionately.’ (p. 3)
The approach focuses on two goals. The first goal is to focus on what will make the biggest impact. It includes three priorities: better management of work-related health risks; businesses with greater need (including sectors with the highest harm and small business); and workers with greater need (such as Māori, Pasifika, migrant and seasonal, younger and older workers). The second goal is to build everyone’s capability, with a focus on four priorities: leadership; worker engagement, representation and participation; health and safety practitioners; and data and insights. (p. 2)External
GDS15–132020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentTechnical Barriers to Trade (TBT) StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorNK, 20182018–NK20Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Reduce TBTs affecting New Zealand firms and increase international regulatory cooperation by maximising the outcomes of our TBT work programme.’ (p. 1)The approach is to provide a more effective TBT work programme across five focus areas, such as negotiating and implementing free trade agreements and participating in the WTO TBT Committee. (pp. 10–19)External
GDS15–142020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentGovernment Tourism Strategy (jointly held between DOC and MBIE)Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorMay, 20192019–202022Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 5Not applicable‘[T]e puāwai tonu o Aotearoa i te tupu tonu o te ao tāpoi – enrich New Zealand Aotearoa through sustainable tourism growth.’ (p. 5)The approach is to use government-led initiatives to support 17 specific workstreams across five outcomes: the economy, the environment, international and domestic visitors, New Zealanders and our communities, and regions. (pp. 7–8, 12–16)External
GDS15–152020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentConformance System StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorJuly, 20192019–20228Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[S]ustain a trusted, reliable and high quality conformance system ... to protect communities and support commerce.’ [A conformance system is] ‘made up of specialist organisations that check if goods and service providers conform to standards or regulations.’ (pp. 3, 5)The approach is to focus on four areas: organisational performance and governance, regulatory quality and practice, partnerships for skills and value, and international connections. (pp. 6–7)External
GDS15–162020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentSmall Business StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorJuly ,20192019–202930Other (not Crown or department staff)Not applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[Empower] small businesses to aspire, succeed and thrive.’ (p. 15)The approach is for the Small Business Council to implement 20 recommendations, such as reviewing the Regional Business Partner Network and establishing a Tax Advocacy Service to assist small businesses in disputes with Inland Revenue. (p. 5)External
GDS15–172020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentOur Employment StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorAugust, 20192019–NK20Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[S]upport New Zealand to become a productive, sustainable and inclusive economy that raises the wellbeing of all New Zealanders.’ (p. 2)The approach is to focus on groups experiencing poor employment outcomes, by outlining population-focused action plans to seize opportunities and reduce inequities. (p. 4)External
GDS15–182020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentEconomic Plan for a Productive, Sustainable and Inclusive EconomyEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorSeptember, 20192019–205032Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 6–7Not applicable‘[B]uild a productive, sustainable and inclusive economy to improve the wellbeing and living standards of all New Zealanders.’ (pp. 6–7)The approach is to undertake numerous actions that take advantage of eight key economic shifts. Outcomes include thriving and dynamic small, medium and large enterprises and regions are connected and equipped with modern and resilient infrastructure. (pp. 6–7)External
GDS15–192020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentResponsibly Delivering Value: A Minerals and Petroleum Resource Strategy for Aotearoa New Zealand 2019–2029Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorNovember, 20192019–202950Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 9, 21Not applicable‘A world-leading environmentally and socially responsible minerals and petroleum sector that delivers affordable and secure resources, for the benefit of current and future New Zealanders.’ (p. 25)The approach is to focus on six action areas across the minerals and petroleum industry, including modernising the Crown Minerals Act and improving industry compliance, to produce a more inclusive, sustainable and productive economy. (p. 9)External
GDS15–202021 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentNational Fuel Plan (jointly held between DPMC and MBIE)Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorMarch, 20202020–NK70Department staff (other than CE) onlyOil Emergency Response Strategy (2008)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[M]inimise the effects of a fuel supply disruption on New Zealand, whatever the cause.’ (p. 2)The approach is to agree communication and coordination arrangements, and regional fuel supply arrangements, between government agencies, Civil Defence Emergency Management (CDEM) groups and fuel sector organisations. (p. 2)External
GDS15–212020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentAgritech Industry Transformation PlanEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorJuly, 20202020–NK54Crown and department staff (other than CE)Not applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘A globally competitive agritech ecosystem, producing ingenious value-adding companies that provide meaningful jobs, solving New Zealand and the world’s sustainability problems.’ (p. 24)The approach is to implement a set of investment actions across six workstreams;
this includes exploring the development of a robotics, automation and sensing institute and a Farm2050 initiative. (pp. 33–34)
External
GDS15–222021 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentCombatting Modern Forms of Slavery 2020-25Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorDecember, 20202020–202529Crown onlyPlan of Action to Prevent People Trafficking (2009)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]o ensure that people are not exploited, either in New Zealand or overseas. We will continue to work together ... to eliminate forced labour, people trafficking and slavery.’ (foreword)The approach is to strengthen three main objectives (prevention, protection and enforcement), and provide an updated framework outlining the actions and responsibilities of the relevant entities. (foreword)External
GDS15–232020 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentBuilding for the Future: Building System Regulatory StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorDecember, 20202020–203521Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 2Not applicable‘High-performing building regulation supporting better buildings for New Zealanders.’ (p. 6)The approach is for MBIE to act as the central regulator, focusing on four interconnected building regulation focus areas, leveraging tools such as laws, compliance, enforcement and partnerships. (p. 8)External
GDS15–242021 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentAdvanced Manufacturing ITP ScopeEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorJuly, 20212021–NK5Not signedFrom the Knowledge Wave to the Digital Age – Mai I Te Ao Mātauranga Ki Te Ao Matihiko Nei (2019)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]o address the challenges and exploit the opportunities ... so the sector can be more productive ... mov[ing] from volume to value, and improv[ing] international competitiveness.’ (p. 3)The approach is to achieve this through growing and upskilling the workforce, developing markets, and building on emerging and existing competitive advantages. (pp. 3–5)External
GDS15–252021 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentAntarctic and Southern Ocean Research Directions and Priorities 2021–2030 (jointly held between LINZ, MPI, MBIE and MFAT)Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorDecember, 20212021–203020Crown onlyAntarctic and Southern
Ocean Science (2011)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Excellent and impactful science that addresses the urgent need to understand the role of Antarctica
and the Southern Ocean in a globally-connected and rapidly changing environment and supports Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to protecting Antarctica and the Southern Ocean.’ (p. 2)
The approach is to focus on four priority research directions: sea-level rise; connections between the cryosphere (frozen water), ocean and atmosphere; ecosystem dynamics; and protection of Antarctic and Southern Ocean environments. (p. 2)External
GDS16–032020 GDS Index16. Ministry of DefenceDefence Capability Plan 2019External SectorJune, 20192019–203044Crown onlyDefence Capability
Plan (2016)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[P]rovides a vision for the capabilities that will deliver on the Policy Statement [2018], and for an enhanced and sustainable Defence Force.’ (p. 3)The approach is to provide an indicative investment plan for Defence Force capabilities to 2030, including planned investments in air, maritime, land and information capabilities. (p. 3)Internal
GDS17–012018 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationNation of Curious Minds – He Whenua Hihiri I Te Mahara: A national strategic plan for science in society (jointly held between MBIE and MoE)Education and Workforce SectorJuly, 20142014–202452Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 9Not applicable‘Encourage and enable better engagement with science and technology in all sectors of New Zealand.’ (p. 9)The approach is to focus on three strategic action areas: enhancing the role of education (e.g. stronger links between STEM educators, learners, scientists and technologists); public engaging with science (e.g. encouraging high-quality science); and the science Sector engaging with the public (e.g. ensuring scientists know how to make research accessible). (pp. 23–31, 38)External
GDS17–022018 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationInternational Student Wellbeing StrategyEducation and Workforce SectorJune, 20172017–NK12Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 7Not applicable‘International students feel welcome, safe and well, enjoy a high quality education and are valued for their contribution to New Zealand.’ (p. 4)The approach is to support international students by increasing their safety, both culturally and economically. Examples include ensuring students have access to safe and reliable transport and access to information about social, cultural and religious services. (p. 7)External
GDS17–042020 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationLearning Support Action Plan 2019–2025Education and Workforce SectorJuly, 20192019–202548Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 14–15Not applicable‘[A]n inclusive education system where every child feels a sense of belonging, is present, makes progress, where their wellbeing is safeguarded and promoted, where learning is a lifelong journey, and where children and young people with learning support needs get the right support at the right time.’ (p. 4)The approach is to target specialist learners’ educational needs through six priority areas, such as introducing Learning Support Coordinators in schools and kura, screening to enable teachers and other educators to identify and respond to children’s learning support needs earlier and strengthening early intervention. (p. 6)External
GDS17–072020 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationTe Rautaki Mātauranga Māori – The Māori Education StrategyEducation and Workforce SectorJuly, 20202020–20508Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 5Not applicable‘Māori are enjoying and achieving education success as Māori, as they develop the skills to participate in te ao Māori, Aotearoa and the wider world.’ (p. 5)The approach is to provide an organising framework to prioritise cross-agency actions focused on achieving educational success for Māori over the long term. (p. 5)External
GDS17–082020 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationTe Rautaki mā te Reo Māori i roto i te Mātauranga – The Māori language in education strategyEducation and Workforce SectorJuly, 20202020–20404Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Growing te reo Māori through education & growing education through te reo Māori to protect and promote the Māori language for future generations.’ (p. 3)The approach is to focus on a range of ideas such as stimulating demand among learners and whānau for Māori language in education, and ensuring that learners can access Māori language in education. (p. 4)External
GDS17–092021 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationStatement of National Education and Learning PrioritiesEducation and Workforce SectorNovember, 20202020–20235Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 1–2‘May issue’ a strategy (see Education and Training Act 2020, s 5(1)) and cited in the GDS‘[H]elping children and young people to attain their educational potential; preparing young people for participation in civic and community life and for work, and promoting resilience, determination, confidence, creative and critical thinking, good social skills and the ability to form good relationships; [and appreciate] ... Te Tiriti o Waitangi.’ (p. 1)The approach focuses on seven priority areas: ensure places of learning are safe and inclusive; have high aspirations for every learner and support these aspirations; reduce barriers to education for all; ensure all learners have a strong foundation in literacy, language and numeracy; incorporate tikanga Māori and te reo Māori; strengthen staff teaching and leadership capabilities to support diverse students; and collaborate with partners to support learners on their journey from education to work. (p. 3)External
GDS17–102021 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationTertiary Education StrategyEducation and Workforce SectorNovember, 20202020–NK3Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 1Required (see Education and Training Act 2020, s 7) and cited in the GDSSets out the ‘long-term strategic direction for tertiary education, including economic, social, and environmental goals, and the development aspirations of Māori and other population groups’. (p. 1)The approach focuses on eight priority areas to support tertiary students: ensure places of learning are safe and inclusive; have high aspirations for every learner and support these aspirations; reduce barriers to education for all; ensure all learners have a strong foundation in literacy, language and numeracy; incorporate tikanga Māori and te reo Māori; strengthen staff teaching and leadership capabilities to support diverse students; collaborate with partners to support learners on their journey from education to work; and enhance the contribution of research and mātauranga Māori in addressing local and global challenges. (p. 3)External
GDS18–042018 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradeOur People StrategyExternal Sector
July, 20172017–202136Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘A happy, healthy and high-performing community, for all [in MFAT].’ (p. 7)The approach is to support people at all stages of their career, including being committed to providing honest and constructive feedback. (p. 5)Internal
GDS18–052018 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade Diversity and Inclusion Strategy 2018–2028External Sector
June, 20182018–202821Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘We aspire to be a workplace that values and utilises diverse and inclusive thinking, people and behaviours. This means that our staff reflect the diversity of New Zealand and the countries we work in, and that the contributions of staff with diverse backgrounds, experiences, skills and perspectives are valued and respected.’ (p. 3)The approach is to attract, retain and develop diverse staff so diversity initiatives are supported and MFAT reflects the demographic composition of New Zealand’s population. (pp. 3, 15, 25)Internal
GDS18–062020 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradeInternational Cooperation for Effective Sustainable Development (ICESD) [Policy Statement]External SectorNovember, 20192019–20302Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[C]ontribute to a more peaceful world, in which all people live in dignity and safety, all countries can prosper, and our shared environment is protected.’ (p. 1)The approach aims to integrate environmental, diplomatic, trade, and security cooperation through MFAT’s policy goals. (p. 1)External
GDS18–072020 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradeIndia – New Zealand 2025: Investing in the RelationshipExternal SectorFebruary, 20202020–202511Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘A relationship based on mutual trust that advances our shared interests ... New Zealanders have improved capability for engaging with India ... Goods and services trade grows for shared prosperity ... New Zealand’s value proposition is known and understood ... Stronger and broader sporting and cultural connections between New Zealand and India.’ (pp. 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13)The approach is to strengthen Aotearoa New Zealand–Indian relationships through political, cultural, economic and diplomatic engagement. (p. 2)External
GDS18–092021 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradeGender Action Plan 2021–2025External SectorJanuary, 20212021–20252Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 2Not applicable‘[G]ender equality and women’s empowerment.’ (p. 1)The approach focuses on three areas: women in governance and leadership; eliminating violence against women and girls; and social protection. (p. 1)External
GDS18–102021 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradeChild & Youth Well-Being Strategic Action Plan 2021–2025External SectorMay, 20212021–20252Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 2Not applicable‘[S]ustainable development outcomes for children and youth who are missing out.’ (p. 1)The approach is for MFAT to invest in four areas: improving governance systems for children
and youth; empowering children and youth to participate and inform development; providing health and learning services; and realising youth potential. (p. 1)
External
GDS18–112021 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradeHuman Rights Strategic Action Plan for International Development Cooperation 2021–2025External SectorOctober, 20212021–20252Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[P]rioritising people and groups at risk of being left behind.’ (p. 1)The approach is to invest in programmes, community-led organisations, mechanisms and tools that will improve economic, social and cultural rights for people at risk of being left behind. (p. 1)External
GDS18–122021 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradeAntarctic and Southern Ocean Research Directions and Priorities 2021–2030 (jointly held between LINZ, MPI, MBIE and MFAT)External SectorDecember, 20212021–203020Crown onlyAntarctic and Southern Ocean Science (2011)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Excellent and impactful science that addresses the urgent need to understand the role of Antarctica
and the Southern Ocean in a globally-connected and rapidly changing environment and supports Aotearoa New Zealand’s commitment to protecting Antarctica and the Southern Ocean.’ (p. 2)
The approach is to focus on four priority research directions: sea-level rise; connections between the cryosphere (frozen water), ocean and atmosphere; ecosystem dynamics; and protection of Antarctic and Southern Ocean environments. (p. 2)External
GDS19–012014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthReduced Waiting Times for Public Hospital Elective ServicesHealth SectorMarch, 20002000–200324Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[R]educed waiting times for elective services, and improved national consistency of access.’ (p. 3)The approach develops a policy framework comprising seven interconnected pathways to reduce waiting times for public hospital elective surgeries. (p. 3)External
GDS19–022014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthPalliative Care StrategyHealth SectorFebruary, 20012001–201165Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘All people who are dying and their family/whānau who could benefit from palliative care have timely access to quality palliative care services that are culturally appropriate and are provided in a co-ordinated way.’ (p. vii)The approach is to create an integrated, cooperative framework with DHBs that ensures a palliative care culture. Actions include training and the implementation of the Paediatric Review recommendation. (pp. 19–20)External
GDS19–032014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthPrimary Health Care StrategyHealth SectorFebruary, 20012001–201140Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘People will be part of local primary health care services that improve their health, keep them well, are easy to get to and co-ordinate their ongoing care. Primary health care services will focus on better health for a population, and actively work to reduce health inequalities between different groups.’ (p. vii)The approach is for MoH and DHBs to develop policy toolkits and funding agreements to instigate a new approach to primary health, which focuses more on population health and the role of the community. (p. 5)External
GDS19–042014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthSexual and Reproductive Health Strategy – Phase OneHealth SectorOctober, 20012001–NK32Crown onlySexual and Reproductive Health Strategy (2001)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Good sexual and reproductive health for all New Zealanders.’ (p. 3)The approach is to design a framework to meet the sexual health needs of particular communities using a two-phase process which guides and aligns the health sector in the management and funding of services for STIs, unwanted pregnancy and HIV/AIDS. (p. iii)External
GDS19–052014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthHealth of Older People StrategyHealth SectorApril, 20022002–NK86Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Older people participate to their fullest ability in decisions about their health and wellbeing and in family, whānau and community life. They are supported in this by co-ordinated and responsive health
and disability support programmes.’ (p. 1)
The approach is to partner with DHBs
to improve the health of older people by implementing the strategy and monitoring outcomes according to each DHB’s implementation plan. (p. 4)
External
GDS19–062014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthYouth Health: A Guide to ActionHealth SectorSeptember, 20022002–200564Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[C]reating an environment in which all young people [12–24-year-olds] can grow and flourish.’ (p. vii)The approach is to improve the health of 12–24-year-olds through implementing a range of actions such as promoting ‘Safer Schools’ and the implementation of anti-bullying programmes in schools; ensuring that health services meet the needs of refugees and migrant young people; and developing a profile of the disabled and chronically ill young people in regions. This plan is part of the Health Strategy (2000), now refreshed, see GDS19-23 (2016). (pp. vii, 3–5, 22)External
GDS19–072014 GDS Index19. Ministry of Health Cancer Control StrategyHealth SectorAugust, 20032003–200884Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘The overall purposes of the strategy are to: reduce the incidence and impact of cancer [and] reduce inequalities with respect to cancer.’ (p. 19)The approach includes 25 objectives to support six goals, along with broad areas for action to achieve the objectives. Examples of objectives include reducing the number of people who develop cancers due to tobacco use and second-hand smoke, and reducing the number of people developing cancers related to physical inactivity and obesity. (pp. 10, 25–26)External
GDS19–082014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthSuicide Prevention Strategy 2006–2016Health SectorJune, 20062006–201636Crown onlyIn Our Hands: Youth Suicide Prevention Strategy (1998)Not applicableYes, p. 2Not applicable‘The overall purposes of this strategy are to: reduce the rate of suicide and suicidal behaviour, reduce the harmful effect and impact associated with suicide and suicidal behaviour on families/ whānau, friends and the wider community, [and] reduce inequalities in suicide and suicidal behaviour.’ (p. 1)The approach is to apply a multi-sectoral approach to suicide prevention, with a particular emphasis on at-risk populations, addressing needs in a holistic manner through evidence- based research and implementing best practice. (p. 7)External
GDS19–092014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthMedicines New ZealandHealth SectorDecember, 20072007–NK24Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 5Not applicable‘New Zealanders will have a medicines system that: delivers quality medicines that are safe and effective, provides access to the medicines they need [and] ensures that medicines are used effectively.’ (p. 7)The approach is to provide an overarching framework for agencies and stakeholders, in order to inform decision-making and ensure a cohesive and responsive medicines system is put in place; ways to do this include making funding decisions more transparent and consulting with stakeholders to ensure current and future needs are met. (p. 10)External
GDS19–102014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthAmbulance Service StrategyHealth SectorJune, 20092009–202013Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 6Not applicable‘[E]nsure that the ambulance sector has clearly defined roles in the emergency and health sectors ... deliver[s] a long-term plan for meeting community emergency health needs [and] integrate[s] ambulance services within the wider health sector.’ (p. 2)The approach focuses on ten initiatives that promote leadership, cohesion and consistency between emergency ambulance providers, with greater national consistency in training, clinical guidelines and oversight and levels of practice. It will also work more closely with key organisations, such as ACC, MoH and DHBs, to integrate ambulance services within the wider health sector. (pp. 3, 4–5, 9)External
GDS19–112018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthNational Plan for Child Cancer Services in New ZealandHealth Sector
December, 20112011–NK54Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[A]chieve national agreement on the service delivery model [including] equitable access ... certainty for parents, families and whānau ... clarity for District Health Boards (DHBs) ... [and] sustainable child cancer services.’ (p. 1)The approach is a two-centre model for the provision of specialist paediatric oncology care, with shared care arrangements with other DHBs; the two specialist centres are to be Starship Children’s Hospital at Auckland DHB and Christchurch Hospital at Canterbury DHB. Further, a national clinical network will
be established for child cancer services in New Zealand. (p. vi)
External
GDS19–122014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthRising to the Challenge – The Mental Health and Addiction Service Development Plan 2012–2017Health SectorDecember, 20122012–201775Crown and Chief ExecutiveMoving Forward: The National Mental Health Plan for More and Better Services (1997), Te Tāhuhu: Improving Mental Health (2005), National Mental Health Information Strategy (2005) and Te Puāwaiwhero: The Second Māori Mental Health and Addiction National Strategic Framework (2008)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Whatever our age, gender or culture, when we need support to improve our mental health and wellbeing or address addiction, we will be able to rapidly access the interventions [we need].’ (p. vi)The approach is to focus on four themes: better use of resources/value for money, improving primary–specialist integration, cementing and building on gains for people with the highest needs and intervening early in the life cycle to prevent later problems. Each theme includes key actions, such as reducing and eliminating the use of seclusion in mental health inpatient settings and increasing access to specialist services for youth offenders. (p. 9)External
GDS19–132014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthSuicide Prevention Action Plan 2013–2016Health SectorMay, 20132013–20168Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[R]educe the rate of suicide and suicidal behaviour, and reduce the harmful effect and impact associated with suicide and suicidal behaviour on families, whānau, friends and communities.’ (p. 3)The approach is to pursue 30 actions that focus on redressing gaps in suicide prevention methods, including strengthening the infrastructure for suicide prevention (such as using social media to prevent suicide) and offering improved services after a suicide. (pp. 4–8)External
GDS19–142014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthNational Health Information Technology Plan Update 2013/14Health SectorNovember, 20132013–201436Other (not Crown or department staff)National Health IT Plan (2010) and Health Information Strategy (2005)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘By 2014 New Zealanders will have a core set of personal health information available electronically to help them and their treatment providers regardless of the setting as they access health services.’ (p. 4)The approach is to design a framework for e-health that describes the way an individual’s health information is collected during their lifetime over a continuum of care. The data is broken down into four levels: a person’s foundation health information, an effective and secure system for sharing information, common clinical information across the continuum of care, and a shared care plan. Priorities are set out (e.g. critical, important or emerging) and key performance indicators are defined (setting out the measures to be met and the actions to be taken). (pp. viii, 10)External
GDS19–152014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthCare Closer to HomeHealth SectorFebruary, 20142014–NK24Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[P]roviding better, integrated health care closer to home for all New Zealanders.’ (p. 1)The approach is to highlight initiatives being carried out by health-care providers to treat health issues early and provide care for patients discharged from hospital within their local communities. (p. 1)External
GDS19–162014 GDS Index19. Ministry of Health’Ala Mo’ui – Pathways to Pacific Health and Wellbeing 2014–2018Health SectorJune, 20142014–201840Crown only’Ala Mo’ui: Pathways to Pacific Health and Wellbeing (2010)Not applicableYes, p. 14Not applicable‘Pacific ‘āiga, kāiga, magafaoa, kōpū tangata, vuvale and fāmili experience equitable health outcomes and lead independent lives.’ (p. 2)The approach is to provide DHBs and other Pacific health-care providers with an outcomes framework and set of actions. Actions include the health sector working across government to decrease overcrowding in Pacific homes (by increasing access to quality, healthy housing), and research on effective approaches to strengthen Pacific health literacy. (p. 14)External
GDS19–172014 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthHe Korowai Oranga – Māori Health StrategyHealth SectorJune, 20142014–NK16Not signedHe Korowai Oranga: Māori Health Strategy (2002)Not applicableYes, p. 4Not applicable‘[T]o drive continuous quality improvement in the development, design and delivery of services for Māori.’ (p. 12)The approach is to focus on effective leadership, planning and measurement. For example, measurement includes the collection of high quality ethnicity data so that all areas of health can measure performance at national, regional and local levels. (p. 13)External
GDS19–182018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthCancer Plan 2015–2018Health Sector
December, 20142015–201840Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 8Not applicable‘[T]o ensure all people have timely access to excellent cancer services that will enable them to live better and longer.’ (p. 8)The approach is to apply a patient pathway approach that focuses on prevention and early detection, diagnosis and treatment, and follow- up care. (p. 8)External
GDS19–192015 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthDisability Support Services Strategic Plan 2014–2018Health SectorJune, 20152014–201822Not signedDisability Support Services
Strategic Plan (2012)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Disabled people and their families are supported to live the lives they choose ... The purpose of the
New Model has been to offer disabled people more choice, control and flexibility regarding the support they receive and the lives they lead, and to test new elements of the disability support system.’ (pp. 1, 10)
The approach is to continue to adapt the Enabling Good Lives (EGL) initiative, including local area coordination, supported self- assessment, enhanced individualised funding and choice in community living. It includes implementing the recommendations in the Putting People First review. (pp. 13–17)External
GDS19–202015 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthImplementing Medicines New Zealand 2015–2020Health SectorJune, 20152015–202020Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Implementing Medicines New Zealand (the Plan) is about the changes required to deliver on Medicines New Zealand (2007) (the Strategy) ... We want New Zealanders, regardless of their ability to pay, to have access to safe, high-quality, effective medicines, and we want those medicines to be used in the best possible way.’ (pp. iii, 1)The approach is to focus on advancing seven impact areas. Impact areas include enabling shared care through an integrated health
care team, optimal use of antimicrobials, and competent and responsive prescribers. The aim is to implement a range of actions but be open to continuously changing priorities and actions as new ideas emerge. (pp. 5–6)
External
GDS19–212018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthCancer Health Information StrategyHealth Sector
July, 20152015–202021Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 9Not applicable‘[T]o deliver comprehensive, accessible and accurate information to support the delivery of quality care across the cancer patient pathway [and to] align with the National Health IT Plan [see GDS19-14] and enable the New Zealand Cancer Plan 2015–2018 [see GDS19-18].’ (pp. 1, 6)The approach is to focus on four interventions: to establish a national framework for managing cancer data; to standardise, digitise and make accessible cancer data at point of care; to aggregate relevant patient and cancer service data into cancer information; and to analyse, produce and communicate cancer intelligence to stakeholders. (p. 7)External
GDS19–222018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthLiving Well with Diabetes 2015–2020Health Sector
October, 20152015–202039Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘All New Zealanders with diabetes, or at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes, are living well and have access to high- quality, people-centred health services.’ (p. 6)The approach is to focus on reducing the personal burden of disease for people with diabetes; providing consistent and equitable services for all New Zealanders; and reducing the cost of diabetes on the public health system, and the broader societal impact in the longer term. (p. 7)External
GDS19–232018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthHealth Strategy 2016Health Sector
April, 20162016–202685 (for both)Crown and Chief ExecutiveHealth Strategy (2000)Not applicableNot foundRequired (see New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000, s 8(1)) and cited in the GDS‘[E]stablishing a health sector that understands people’s needs and provides services that are integrated across sectors, emphasising investment early in life, maintaining wellness, preventing illness, and providing support for the final stages of life.’ (Future Direction, p. ii)

‘[I]dentifies 27 areas for action over five years to make the Strategy happen.’ (Roadmap of Actions 2016, p. 1)
Future Direction: The approach in the Future Direction document is to focus on five key themes: people-powered, closer to home, value and high performance, one team and smart system. (p. ii)

Roadmap of Actions: The approach of the Roadmap of Actions document is to identify 27 areas for action, including informing people about public and personal health services so they can be ‘health smart’ and have greater control over their health and wellbeing; and ensuring the right services are delivered at the right location in an equitable and clinically and financially sustainable way. (p. 1)
Internal
GDS19–242018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthPharmacy Action Plan 2016 to 2020Health Sector
May, 20162016–202048Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable'[D]eveloping pharmacist services within an integrated health and disability system that supports people to stay well throughout their lives ... These actions give a further level of detail beyond that provided in the ... Health Strategy: Roadmap of Actions 2016.’(p. 1)The approach is to focus on specific ways in which the pharmacy workforce can contribute to each of the four focus areas: population
and personal health, medicines management services, minor ailments and referral, and dispensing and supply services. Examples of actions for the population and personal health area include ensuring pharmacists can record their activities in national information systems (such as the National Immunisation Register) and establishing a collaborative programme to research and evaluate public and personal health services that pharmacists provide. (p. 13)
External
GDS19–252018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthDisability Strategy 2016–2026 (jointly held between MoH and MSD)Health Sector
November, 20162016–202652Crown onlyDisability Strategy (2001)Not applicableYes, pp. 8, 22Required (see New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000, s 8(2)) and cited in the GDS‘New Zealand is a non- disabling society – a place where disabled people have an equal opportunity to achieve their goals and aspirations, and all of New Zealand works together to make this happen.’ (p. 6)The approach is to use a dual pathway strategy to achieve the eight desired outcomes. For example, outcome 8 is leadership, and actions include that disabled people are recognised as experts in their own lives and people in leadership roles in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors will be supported to see themselves as allies to the disability community. The strategy also contains a detailed timeline. (pp. 39, 46)External
GDS19–262021 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthHealth Research Strategy 2017-2027 (jointly held between MoH and MBIE)Health SectorJune, 20172017–202752Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 4-5Required (see Health Research Council Act 1990, s 34(2)) but not cited in the GDS‘By 2027, New Zealand will have a world-leading health research and innovation system that, through excellent research, improves the health
and wellbeing of all
New Zealanders.’ (p. 6)
The approach is to focus on four strategic priorities (and implement specific actions): invest in excellent health research; create a vibrant research environment in the health Sector; build and strengthen pathways for translating research findings into policy and practice; and advance innovative ideas and commercial opportunities. (p. 10)External
GDS19–272018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthFaiva Ora 2016–2021 – National Pasifika Disability PlanHealth Sector
August, 20172016–202127Not signedFaiva Ora National Pasifika
Disability Plan (2014)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Pasifika disabled people and their families are supported to live the lives they choose.’ (p. 1)The approach is to focus on the following four priorities: improving outcomes for Pasifika disabled children, youth and their families; Pasifika communities are able to better engage with and support individuals with disabilities and their families to participate in their communities; disability services and supports meet the needs of Pasifika disabled people and their families; and stakeholders work in partnership to address challenges experienced by Pasifika disabled people and their families. (p. 15)External
GDS19–282020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthInfluenza Pandemic Plan: A framework for actionHealth SectorAugust, 20172017–NK193Chief Executive onlyInfluenza Pandemic Action Plan (2010)Not applicableYes, p. 10Not applicable‘To minimise deaths, serious illness and serious disruption to communities and the economy arising from an influenza pandemic.’ (p. 1)The approach is to provide a six-phase model of actions: plan for it, keep it out, stamp it out, manage it (pandemic management), manage it post-peak and recover from it (recovery). (p. 9)External
GDS19–292018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthWhāia Te Ao Mārama 2018 to 2022 – The Māori Disability Action PlanHealth Sector
March, 20182018–202218Other (not Crown or department staff)Not applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Tāngata whaikaha pursue a good life with support ... Whāia Te Ao Mārama is aligned with the vision and principles of enabling good lives and transforming the disability support system, which offer disabled people greater choice and control over the supports they receive, so that they can plan for the lives they want.’ (pp. 1, 3)The approach is to work with tāngata whaikaha (Māori with disabilities) to achieve six goals, including participating in the development of health and disability services, participating in their community, and receiving disability support services that are responsive to Te Ao Māori. (p. 8)External
GDS19–302018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthWhere I Live; How I Live – Disability Support Services Community Residential Support Services Strategy 2018 to 2020Health Sector
March, 20182018–202033Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[P]rovide disabled people and their families/whānau with greater choice, control and flexibility, while acknowledging that people’s own experiences will contribute to their level of desire to explore different living choices.’ (p. 16)The approach is to implement ten actions, including working with the health and disability sector to improve options for attracting and retaining skilled support workers, and ensuring that the recently established guidelines on preventing and managing abuse are implemented effectively. (pp. 20–21)External
GDS19–312018 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthMental Health and Addiction Workforce Action Plan 2017–2021Health Sector
April, 20182017–202152Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 21Not applicable‘For the mental health and addiction workforce, ... [this means] enabling people to thrive and experience wellbeing wherever they live
and whatever their circumstances.’ (p. vii)
The approach is to focus on four priority
areas: a workforce that is focused on people and improved outcomes, a workforce that is integrated and connected across the continuum, a workforce that is competent and capable and a workforce that is the right size and skill mix. (p. viii)
Internal
GDS19–322020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthNational Poliomyelitis Response Plan for New ZealandHealth SectorFebruary, 20192019–NK26Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘New Zealand [is] ready with a prompt, effective and evidence-based response if a case is imported.’ (p. 1)The approach is to outline a response plan to a potential outbreak of poliomyelitis (polio) that is tailored towards case, contact and community responses, using a risk-based assessment. (pp. 10–15)External
GDS19–332020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthNational Syphilis Action PlanHealth SectorJune, 20192019–202416Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[G]uide a coordinated and systematic response to interrupt ongoing transmission of infectious syphilis and to prevent congenital syphilis.’ (p. 4)The approach is to collaborate with stakeholders across the health sector to respond to a syphilis epidemic through a combination of national actions led by MoH, and regional actions led by DHBs and specialist sexual health services. (pp. 4–5)External
GDS19–342020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthStrategy to Prevent and Minimise Gambling Harm 2019/20 to 2021/22Health SectorJune, 20192019–202182Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 20‘May allocate responsibility for ... [a] strategy to a department’ (see Gambling Act 2003, s 317(1)) and cited in the GDS‘Government, the gambling sector, communities and families/ whānau working together to prevent and minimise gambling harm, and to reduce related health inequities.’ (p. 19)The approach is to address the needs of people with gambling-related issues according to a continuum-of-harm spectrum, to guide the level of intervention and associated funding priorities, working together with DIA, which covers the regulation of gambling activity. (pp. 15–16)External
GDS19–352020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthEvery Life Matters – He Tapu te Oranga o ia Tangata – Suicide Prevention Strategy 2019–2029Health SectorSeptember, 20192019–202948Crown and Chief ExecutiveNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 2Not applicable‘Reduced suicide rate ... Wellbeing for all.’ (p. 2)Building a strong system for suicide prevention includes focussing on four areas: strengthening national leadership; using evidence and collective knowledge to make a difference; developing the suicide prevention workforce to have capacity and capability to respond; and evaluating and monitoring Every Life Matters. Key to supporting wellbeing is working to increase protective factors and reduce
risk factors across the suicide prevention continuum, including promotion, prevention, intervention and postvention. (p. 10)
External
GDS19–362021 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthPlanned Care Strategic Approach: 2019–2024Health SectorSeptember, 20192019–202420Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘New Zealanders experience timely, appropriate access to quality Planned Care which achieves equitable health outcomes ... [Planned Care] encompasses medical and surgical activity traditionally known as Elective or Arranged services that are delivered by hospitals.’ (pp. 6–7)The approach focuses on five strategic priorities to set a new direction for planned care services, ensuring improvement of access to, and
quality of, planned care within publicly funded resources. The priorities are: understanding planned care needs, balancing national consistency and local needs, simplifying pathways for service users, optimising sector capability and capacity and fit for the future. (p. 8)
External
GDS19–372020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthMahi Aroha: Carers' Strategy Action Plan 2019–2023 (jointly held between MoE, MoH, TPK, MSD and OT) [[Please note: This GDS has been archived by MoE and MSD]]Health SectorDecember, 20192019–202340Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘An action plan that recognises, values,
and supports carers is an investment in New Zealand’s future .’ (p. 6)
The approach is to address key priorities identified by carers and the Government, by creating and implementing five-year action plans. The ongoing issues include the need for respite, support when things are not going well, assistance with the increasing financial pressures of caring, and a desire for greater carer choice and flexibility. (p. 6)External
GDS19–382020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthCOVID-19 Health and Disability System Response PlanHealth SectorApril, 20202020–NK37Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Success under this strategy means that COVID-19 is eliminated in New Zealand or reduced to a small number of cases, the large majority of which are “imported” and linked to international travel.’ (p. 2)The approach is to focus on eight priority populations (including Māori) and eight planning areas (workforce, public health, hospitals, care in the community, laboratories, infection prevention and control, health
and disability supply chain, and support for priority population) in accordance with the Government’s COVID-19 elimination strategy. (pp. 2, 12, 19)
External
GDS19–392020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthOla Manuia – Pacific Health and Wellbeing action plan 2020–2025Health SectorJune, 20202020–202548Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 18Not applicable‘Pacific people lead independent and resilient lives ... live longer in good health ... have equitable health outcomes.’ (p. 17)The approach is three-fold: to strengthen health knowledge and skills of Pacific people to support informed choices about their health and wellbeing; to change the health and disability system to deliver more responsive, more accessible and high-quality services for Pacific families; and to strengthen actions to create environments that improve health equity for Pacific families. (p. 18)External
GDS19–402020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthWhakamaua – Māori Health Action Plan 2020–2025Health SectorJuly, 20202020–202578Crown and Chief ExecutiveNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 66Not applicable‘The overall aim of He Korowai Oranga is Pae ora – healthy futures for Māori ... Whānau ora
Healthy families ...
Mauri ora
Healthy individuals ...
Wai ora
Healthy environment.’
(p. 18)
The approach is to focus on eight priority areas for action: Māori–Crown partnerships; Māori leadership; Māori health and disability workforce; Māori health sector development; cross-sector action; quality and safety; insights and evidence; and performance and accountability. (p. 27)External
GDS19–412020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthTā Tātau Rautaki – Our StrategyHealth SectorOctober, 20202020–NK1Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 1Not applicable‘A fair, effective and sustainable [health] system that people trust.’ (p. 1)The approach is to focus on six areas: build capability to engage meaningfully with Māori, work with stakeholders to achieve shared
goals, support Māori to succeed, ensure data insights and evidence drive decisions, invest in robust and functional technology, and make the Ministry a great place to work. (p. 1)
Internal
GDS19–422020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthKaiāwhina Workforce Action Plan Health SectorNovember, 20202020–20258Not signedKaiāwhina Workforce Action Plan (2015-2020)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘The moemoeā (vision and dream) of the taonga is to enhance mana and evoke a sense of tino- rangatiratanga for all Kaiāwhina [non-regulated roles in the health and disability sector].’ (p. 2)The approach is to focus on five key priorities, with each priority supported by a set of key actions: building cultural capability, connecting Kaiāwhina, accelerating new ways of working and ecosystem thinking, creating workforce knowledge and data, and supplying and developing the workforce. (pp. 4–8)Internal
GDS19–432020 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthCOVID-19: Kia Kaha, Kia Māia, Kia Ora Aotearoa – Psychological and Mental Wellbeing PlanHealth SectorDecember, 20202020–NK53Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 7Not applicable‘The mental wellbeing framework has a vision of: Pae ora (healthy futures): An equitable and thriving Aotearoa in which mental wellbeing is promoted and protected.’ (p. 6)The approach is to focus on five areas: build the social, cultural and economic foundations for mental wellbeing, foster community-led solutions, equip whānau and individuals to
look after their mental wellbeing, expand primary mental health and addiction support in communities, and strengthen specialist services. (pp. 20, 24, 27, 29, 31)
External
GDS19–442021 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthKia Manawanui Aotearoa – Long-term pathway to mental wellbeingHealth SectorAugust, 20212021–203176Crown and Chief ExecutiveNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 24Not applicable‘[P]eople and whānau have their basic needs met, know how to strengthen their own mental wellbeing, and live in communities with diverse, well-integrated avenues for support when and where it is needed.’ (p. 8)The approach is three-fold: a strong government mandate and commitment to transformation; a commitment to a collective approach and joint effort towards a shared vision; and a set of guiding principles that underpin how the Ministry will work, including a strong focus on achieving equity. (p. 32)External
GDS19–452021 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthData and Information Strategy for Health and Disability: Roadmap 2021–2024Health SectorNovember, 20212021–202428Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[C]reate a modern, collaborative, consumer centric and innovative health and disability system.’ (p. 4)The approach is to provide a two-year road map of actions across five priority areas (data foundations; equity and data sovereignty; consumer participation; people and leadership; and data and information accessibility), to be delivered over three time horizons, guiding national and local level action. (pp. 4, 9, 10)Internal
GDS19–462021 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthData and Information Strategy for Health and Disability – He Rautaki Raraunga, He Rautaki Pārongo mō te Pūnaha Hauora, Whaikaha hokiHealth SectorNovember, 20212021–NK40Department staff (other than CE) onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Ensuring people have access to and control of their own health information is essential, as well as making sure quality data is available for evidence-based decision-making ... better data management, governance and transparency.’ (p. 6)The approach is to focus on five areas: data foundations; equity and data sovereignty; consumer participation; people and leadership; and data accessibility. (pp. 20–33)Internal
GDS19–472021 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthCOVID-19 Māori Health Protection PlanHealth SectorDecember, 20212021–NK48Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]o protect the health and wellbeing of whānau, hapū, iwi, and hapori Māori by preventing and mitigating the impacts of COVID-19 on their health and wellbeing.’ (p. 13)The approach is to focus on increasing vaccination coverage among Māori, and building resilience of Māori health and disability service providers to respond to the Delta variant and manage ongoing impacts of COVID-19. (p. 2)External
GDS19–482021 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthSmokefree Aotearoa 2025 Action PlanHealth SectorDecember, 20212021–202536Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 6Not applicable‘By 2025, daily smoking prevalence is less than five percent for all population groups in New Zealand.’ (p. 6)The approach is to focus on six areas: ensure Māori leadership and decision-making at
all levels; increase health promotion and community mobilisation; increase evidence- based stop smoking services; reduce the addictiveness and appeal of smoked tobacco products; reduce the availability of smoked tobacco products; and ensure manufacturers, importers and retailers meet their legal obligations. (pp. 16–27)
External
GDS20–012020 GDS Index20. Ministry of Housing and Urban DevelopmentHomelessness Action Plan 2020–2023Social Services and Community SectorFebruary, 20202020–202363Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Our vision is that homelessness in New Zealand is prevented where possible, or is rare, brief and non-recurring.’ (p. 1)The approach is to focus on four areas: prevention, supply, support and system enablers. Under each area there are immediate and longer-term actions such as supporting women leaving prison with safe and stable accommodation, and increasing public housing. (pp. 6–12)External
GDS20–022021 GDS Index20. Ministry of Housing and Urban DevelopmentPublic Housing Plan 2021–2024Social Services and Community SectorJanuary, 20212021–20246Not signedPublic Housing Plan (2018)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]o increase the number of newly built public houses and progressively decrease leases over time.’ (p. 1)The approach is to identify areas where population growth has exceeded new housing development, leading to rising rents and housing shortfalls. Focus area factors include sharp
rise in housing costs, reliance on motels for emergency housing, overcrowding, population increases that have outpaced construction, infrastructure not able to support development and housing deprivation. (p. 5)
External
GDS20–032021 GDS Index20. Ministry of Housing and Urban DevelopmentTe Tauākī Kaupapa Here a te Kāwanatanga mō te Whakawhanake Whare, Tāone anō hoki – Government Policy Statement on Housing and Urban DevelopmentSocial Services and Community SectorSeptember, 20212021–205158Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 4–5Required (see Kāinga Ora– Homes and Communities Act 2019, s 22) and cited in the GDS‘[A] multi-decade system strategy for housing and urban development. It
will inform, influence and align activity across the system to respond to the challenges we face ... Everyone in Aotearoa New Zealand lives in a home, and within a community that meets their needs and aspirations.’ (pp. 5, 6)
The approach is to focus on six areas: ensure more affordable homes are built; ensure
houses meet needs; enable people into stable, affordable homes; support whānau to have safe, healthy affordable homes with secure tenure; re-establish housing’s primary role as a home rather than a financial asset; and plan and invest in our places. (p. 24)
External
GDS22–022020 GDS Index22. Ministry of Māori Development—Te Puni KōkiriMahi Aroha: Carers' Strategy Action Plan 2019–2023 (jointly held between MoE, MoH, TPK, MSD and OT) [[Please note: This GDS has been archived by MoE and MSD]]Māori Affairs Sector
December, 20192019–202340Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable'An action plan that recognises, values,
and supports carers is an investment in New Zealand’s future .’ (p. 6)
The approach is to address key priorities identified by carers and the Government, by creating and implementing five-year action plans. The ongoing issues include the need for respite, support when things are not going well, assistance with the increasing financial pressures of caring, and a desire for greater carer choice and flexibility. (p. 6)External
GDS22–042021 GDS Index22. Ministry of Māori Development—Te Puni KōkiriMāori Housing Investment Strategy 2018–19 to 2020–21Māori Affairs Sector
NK, 20182018–202113Crown onlyMāori Housing Network Investment Strategy (2015)Not applicableYes, p. 12Not applicable‘[T]o target its kāinga investment to support the aspirations and needs of whānau, hapū and iwi over the next three years.’ (p. 2)The approach is to focus on three key
areas: improving the quality of housing for whānau; supporting papakāinga (Māori land) development and activities to help Māori into affordable housing; and building the capability of whānau, hapū and iwi, and rōpū, to respond to Māori housing aspirations. (p. 12)
External
GDS23–022018 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentDisability Strategy 2016–2026 (jointly held between MoH and MSD)Social Services and Community SectorNovember, 20162016–202652Crown onlyDisability Strategy (2001), originally held by MoHNot applicableYes, pp. 8, 22Required (see New Zealand Public Health and Disability Act 2000, s 8(2)) and cited in the GDS‘New Zealand is a non- disabling society – a place where disabled people have an equal opportunity to achieve their goals and aspirations, and all of New Zealand works together to make this happen.’ (p. 6)The approach is to use a dual pathway strategy to achieve the eight desired outcomes. For example, outcome 8 is leadership, and actions include that disabled people are recognised as experts in their own lives and people in leadership roles in the public, private and not-for-profit Sectors will be supported to see themselves as allies to the disability community. The strategy also contains a detailed timeline. (pp. 39, 46)External
GDS23–042018 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentNew Zealand Sign Language Strategy 2018–2023Social Services and Community SectorOctober, 20182018–202325Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]o enable Deaf and other NZSL users to learn and use NZSL naturally within a community
of users, contributing significantly to its survival, sustainability and vitality.’ (p. 5)
The approach is to focus on five internationally recognised language planning priorities: acquisition (the learning of a language by children and adults); use/access (the ability to use a language in any or all domains of society, including within whānau); attitude (the beliefs and opinions of language users and others towards that language); documentation (the systematic recording of language use for research and reference); and status (how a language is regarded by its users and others). (pp. 12–16)External
GDS23–052020 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentTe Pae Tata Māori Strategy and Action PlanSocial Services and Community SectorJune, 20192019–NK28Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘To embed a Māori world view into our organisation that will honour our commitment as a Te Tiriti o Waitangi partner and prioritise the needs of whānau.’ (p. 7)The approach is to focus on three key shifts: mana manaaki (a positive experience every time – earning the respect and trust of Māori); kotahitanga (partnering for greater impact – forming genuine partnerships with Māori; and kia takatū tātou (supporting long term social and economic development – supporting Māori aspirations). (p. 11)Internal
GDS23–062020 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentFamily Violence Funding ApproachSocial Services and Community SectorJuly, 20192019–202226Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[A] future where providers are sustainably funded and services are whānau- centred, outcomes- focused and integrated.’ (p. 4)The approach is to focus on four priorities: having a whānau-centred approach to service delivery; setting sights on long-term recovery; giving communities universal support, how and when they need it; and giving regions more support. (pp. 15–18)External
GDS23–072020 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentPacific Prosperity: Our People, Our Solutions, Our FutureSocial Services and Community SectorOctober, 20192019–NK24Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘To rejuvenate the Ministry’s delivery and engagement of services for Pacific peoples, families and communities, so they are safe, thrive and flourish in Aotearoa.’ (p. 13)The approach is to focus on three communities: Pacific peoples and families; staff and people who are providing services on behalf of the Ministry; and communities. Examples of actions include improving access to healthy and sustainable housing; improving current information capture, reporting and sharing processes; and better articulating the meaning of a ‘Pacific provider service’. (pp. 18–19)Internal
GDS23–082020 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentBetter Late Life – He Oranga Kaumātua 2019 to 2034 – Super SeniorsSocial Services and Community SectorNovember, 20192019–203420Crown onlyPositive Ageing Strategy (2001)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘New Zealand embraces the opportunities that an ageing population and longevity brings.’ (p. 2)The approach is to focus on five key areas, and within each area, a set of goals and actions. The areas are achieving financial security and economic participation; promoting healthy ageing and improving access to services; creating diverse housing choices and options; enhancing opportunities for participation and social connection; and making environments accessible. (p. 11)External
GDS23–092020 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentDisability Action Plan 2019–2023Social Services and Community SectorNovember, 20192019–202312Not signedDisability Action Plan
(2014–2018)
Not applicableYes, pp. 8-9Not applicable‘To deliver the eight outcomes in the
New Zealand Disability Strategy 2016–2026.’ (p. 3)
The approach is to develop work programmes, and work with government agencies and their partners. All parties are expected to be responsive to the needs and potential of all disabled people, including Māori; Pacific peoples; women and girls; disabled people with complex needs; and whānau. (pp. 4–5)External
GDS23–112021 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentCampaign for Action on Family Violence: Framework for change 2019–2023Social Services and Community SectorJune, 20202019–202344Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 9 - 10Not applicable‘A safer New Zealand, where more men are violence free.’ (p. 9)The approach is to motivate and support long- term behaviour change and prevent intimate partner violence by disrupting and addressing some of the factors that are identified as root causes or drivers of harm, or are reinforcing factors. (p. 9)External
GDS23–122021 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentE Tū Whānau Mahere Rautaki: Framework for Change 2019–2024Social Services and Community SectorJune, 20202019–202464Crown onlyE Tu Whānau Programme of Action for Addressing Family Violence 2013 – 2018 (2013)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Whānau are self- managing and resilient ... connected and feel like they belong ... have positive relationships in
Te Ao Māori ... feel safe in their homes and communities ... are living healthy lifestyles ... are strengthened and participating in society [and] ... have increased economic independence and rangatiratanga.’ (p. 11)
The approach is for MSD to support kaupapa Māori approaches: Te mana kaha o te whānau (power and strength of whānau), honouring and invoking Māori principles/values (culturally responsive engagement/delivery), community-led solutions and action supported by government, and drawing on indigenous knowledge and evidence. (p. 4)External
GDS23–132021 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentPathways for Change 2019–2023Social Services and Community SectorJune, 20202019–202351Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, pp. 4-5Not applicable‘Pacific families and communities are safe, resilient and enjoy wellbeing.’ (p. 9)The approach is to support Pasifika community groups to identify their own issues and solutions, lead positive change and strengthen their capabilities to achieve these goals. (pp. 28–29)External
GDS23–142021 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentElder Abuse in Aotearoa 2020Social Services and Community SectorJuly, 20202020–NK25Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[A]n Aotearoa where older people are supported to live abuse free and the prevalence of elder abuse and neglect is reduced. We also want all people who need and want help with elder abuse to be able to access support.’ (p. 10)The approach is for the strategy to be implemented in three phases, focusing first on stabilising, then strengthening, and finally growing the response services to deliver on long term and sustainable solutions to reduce the occurrence of elder abuse. (p. 13)External
GDS23–152020 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentWorking Matters: An Action Plan to ensure disabled people and people with health conditions have an equal opportunity to access employmentSocial Services and Community SectorJuly, 20202020–202215Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]o help ensure disabled people and people with health conditions have
an equal opportunity to access good work.’ (p. 14)
The approach is to focus on three objectives (supply, match, and demand) and to implement a range of specific actions. Areas of action identified are: education and training, apprenticeships and internships, referral pathways, employment services, partnerships with employers, information, workplace health and safety, state sector exemplars and future of work. (p. 14)External
GDS23–182021 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentBetter Later Life Action Plan – He Oranga Kaumātua: Action plan 2021–2024Social Services and Community SectorSeptember, 20212021–202428Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicableSupport ‘older workers to use their skills and experience and [enable] employers to build a resilient, multigenerational workforce ... [ensure] there are a wide range of safe, secure and affordable options that meet older peoples’ needs ... [enable] older people to embrace technology and [ensure] everyone can access essential services.’ (p. 9)The approach is to prioritise employment for older workers to enhance financial security and greater participation in the economy; increase supply of accessible, safe and affordable housing for older people; and increase digital inclusion so older people can access public services and have social connections. (pp. 18–22)External
GDS24–012014 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportNational Airspace Policy of New ZealandEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorApril, 20122012–NK10Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[P]romote a safe and capable airspace and air navigation system both within New Zealand and the international airspace it manages, that measures up to international safety standards and best practices, and contributes to economic growth through efficiency gains.’ (p. 7)The approach is for the Civil Aviation Authority to develop a National Airspace and Air Navigation Plan. Aspects to be incorporated
in the planning process include the airspace classification and designation, air traffic management, communications/navigation/ surveillance, meteorology, aerodromes, and aeronautical information management. (pp. 3, 6)
External
GDS24–022018 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportInternational Air Transport Policy Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
August, 20122012–NK3Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[P]utting in place reciprocal open skies agreements, except where it is not in the best interests of the country as a whole.’ (p. 1)The approach is to continue to engage in multilateral and regional initiatives where these are consistent with the thrust of the policy, including enhancing links at a regional level with the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), and continuing to monitor aero-political and commercial developments to assess when a resumption of negotiations with the European Commission might prove desirable. (p. 3)External
GDS24–032018 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportFramework for Shaping our Transport SystemEconomic Development and Infrastructure Sector
June, 20182018–NK8Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘The purpose of the transport system is
to improve people’s wellbeing, and the liveability of places.’ (p. 3)
The approach is to focus on five areas: inclusive access, economic prosperity, healthy and safe people, environmental sustainability, and resilience and security. (pp. 4–6)External
GDS24–042020 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportTaking Flight: An Aviation System for the Automated Age [Drone Integration Paper]Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
July, 20192019–NK19Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Our vision is to enable a thriving, innovative and safe drone sector.’ (p. 1)The approach is to focus on four building blocks to achieve safe drone integration. The four building blocks are: regulation; funding and investment; infrastructure and technology (such as transponders, ground stations, transport connections and drone ports); and research and development. Each building block is to have proposed actions and timeframes. (pp. 10–11)External
GDS24–052021 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportHei Arataki – Ministry of Transport Māori StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorSeptember, 20192019–20231Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘A transport system that enables Māori to flourish.’ (p. 1)The approach focuses on three goals: strengthen the cultural capabilities of staff so they can better engage with Māori partners, form long-lasting partnerships, and embed tikanga Māori into policy design and advice to deliver outcomes for Māori. (p. 1)Internal
GDS24–062020 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportRoad to Zero – New Zealand's Road Safety Strategy 2020–2030Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
December, 20192020–203068Crown onlySafer Journeys: Road Safety Strategy 2010–2020 (2010) and Safer Journeys: Action Plan 2016–2020 (2016)Not applicableYes, p. 6Not applicable‘[N]o one is killed or seriously injured in road crashes. It is based on Vision Zero – a global movement that has seen significant decreases in road trauma in Sweden, New York and parts of Australia.’ (p. 20)The approach is to aim for a 40 percent reduction in deaths and serious injuries by 2030. The target will be achieved by focusing on five key areas: infrastructure improvements and speed management; vehicle safety; work-related road safety; road user choices; and system management. This strategy will be supported by a series of action plans over the next 10 years. (pp. 5, 7)External
GDS24–072020 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportTransport Evidence Base StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure Sector
December, 20192019–202252Chief Executive onlyTransport Research
Strategy (2016)
Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Ensure the transport sector has the right data, information, research and evaluation to deliver an evidence-based transport system that improves wellbeing and liveability.’ (p. 9)The approach is to integrate previous strategies and focus on five enablers (improve access, improve governance, invest in the right activities, facilitate collaboration and develop capacity and capability). The intention is to apply all five enablers across the domain
plan, the research strategy and the evaluation strategy. Both the domain plan and the research strategy have been incorporated into this strategy (they were separate strategies that have since been archived). (p. 9)
External
GDS24–082021 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportGovernment Policy Statement on Land Transport 2021/22–2030/31Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorSeptember, 20202021–203059Crown onlyGovernment Policy Statement on Land Transport (2018)Not applicableNot foundRequired (see Land Transport Management Act 2003, s 66) and cited in the GDS‘A transport system that improves wellbeing and liveability.’ (p. 5)The approach is to focus on four strategic priorities: safety, better travel options, improving freight connections and climate change. The strategy sets out a summary of key policy direction documents. (pp. 6, 48)External
GDS24–092020 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportMaritime Security StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure Sector
December, 20202020–NK40Chief Executive onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 5Not applicable‘A maritime security sector that secures
New Zealand’s
significant maritime economic, cultural and environmental interests, and is better able to deter adversaries, reduce harm to New Zealand communities and exert effective Kaitiakitanga (guardianship) of the sea.’ (p. 5)
The approach is based on four mutually reinforcing and overlapping pillars: understand, engage, prevent and respond. Together they guide how the sector and maritime security will prioritise operational activity and direct investment. They have also developed three core implementation priorities: enabling
the comprehensive multi-agency approach; establishing sector planning and assessment expectations; and allocating resources to support the strategy’s investment priorities. (pp. 17, 29)
External
GDS24–102021 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportRail PlanEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorApril, 20212021–203148Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]o provide modern transit systems in our largest cities, and to enable increasing volumes of freight to be moved by rail.’ (p. 4)The approach is to establish a new long-term planning and funding framework under the Land Transport Management Act 2003. Key investment priorities include investing in the national rail network, the metropolitan rail and regional development. (pp. 20–41)External
GDS25-012021 GDS Index25. New Zealand Customs ServiceInformation Management Strategy 2021 – 2024External SectorSeptember, 20212021–202424Not signedNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 9Not applicable‘Information is: Digitally managed by design in a safe, secure environment. Collected once. Easy to find, accessible, used to its maximum potential, in a minimum of systems, managed as a strategic asset, seamlessly and reliably.’ (p. 13)The approach is to improve information management by developing a framework to shape initiatives and projects that support business needs and legal obligations. (p. 10)Internal
GDS26–012021 GDS Index26. New Zealand Security Intelligence ServiceDiversity and Inclusion Strategy 2021–2025 (jointly held between GCSB and NZSIS)Finance and Government Administration SectorJuly, 20212021–202519Chief Executive onlyDiversity and Inclusion Strategy 2017–2020 (2018)Not applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Our workforce and work environment reflects the diversity of New Zealand, where our collective diversity is celebrated and embraced.’ (p. 6)The approach is to focus on increasing diversity in recruitment and the workforce, particularly in senior leadership positions, to ensure the environment is inclusive and diverse. (pp. 16–19)Internal
GDS27–012014 GDS Index27. Oranga Tamariki – Ministry for ChildrenChildren’s Action PlanSocial Services and Community SectorOctober, 20122012–201716Not signedNot applicableMinistry of Social
Development
Not foundNot applicable‘New Zealanders want to know what action is being taken to protect children and when each milestone will be achieved ... The Children’s Action Plan provides this framework.’ (p. 1)The approach is to act early through better reporting, easier ways to raise concerns, clarity on society’s expectations of parents, and advice on how to spot child abuse and neglect. (p. 3)External
GDS27–022018 GDS Index27. Oranga Tamariki – Ministry for ChildrenYouth Justice Work Programme 2013–2023 (previously called Youth Crime Action Plan)Social Services and Community SectorOctober, 20132013–202372Crown onlyYouth Offending
Strategy (2002)
Ministry of Justice
(previously called Youth Crime Action Plan)
Not foundNot applicable‘[T]he target is a 25% reduction in youth appearing before the Youth Court by 2017.’ (p. 4)The approach is to collaborate across agencies and communities and build on previous strategies concerning youth crime. The strategy also sets out best practice measures for the next ten years. (p. 4)External
GDS27–032020 GDS Index27. Oranga Tamariki – Ministry for ChildrenMahi Aroha: Carers' Strategy Action Plan 2019–2023 (jointly held between MoE, MoH, TPK, MSD and OT) [[Please note: This GDS has been archived by MoE and MSD]]Social Services and Community SectorDecember, 20192019–202340Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘An action plan that recognises, values,
and supports carers is an investment in New Zealand’s future .’ (p. 6)
The approach is to address key priorities identified by carers and the Government, by creating and implementing five-year action plans. The ongoing issues include the need for respite, support when things are not going well, assistance with the increasing financial pressures of caring, and a desire for greater carer choice and flexibility. (p. 6)External
GDS27–042021 GDS Index27. Oranga Tamariki – Ministry for ChildrenFuture Direction Action PlanSocial Services and Community SectorSeptember, 20212021–20237Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable'All children are safe, loved and nurtured by whānau, hapū, and iwi, supported by thriving communities.’ (p. 3)The approach is to focus on five key areas: organisational blueprint; people and culture; relationships, partnering and decision-making; social work practice; and data, insights and evidence. (p. 4)Internal
GDS28–032021 GDS Index28. Public Service CommissionKia Toipoto – Public Service Action Plan 2021–2024Finance and Government Administration SectorNovember, 20212021–20245Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘Making substantial progress towards closing gender, Māori, Pacific, and ethnic pay gaps. Accelerating progress for wāhine Māori, Pacific women, and women from ethnic communities. Creating fairer workplaces for all, including disabled people and members of rainbow communities.’ (p. 3)The approach is to prioritise transparency in agencies, ensure equal pay through monitoring, encourage gender and ethnic representation and leadership in the workplace, support career pathways and equitable progression opportunities, eliminate all forms of bias and discrimination in human resource systems, and allow access to flexible-by-default working without affecting pay or progression. (p. 4)External
GDS30–012014 GDS Index30. Statistics New ZealandTransforming the New Zealand Census of Population and DwellingsFinance and Government Administration SectorApril, 20122012–203045Not signedNot applicableNot applicableNot foundNot applicable‘[T]o produce census- type information from administrative sources, rather than by the current census approach, which takes a survey of the whole population.’ (p. 39)The approach is a four-phase approach over time to manage the high level of risk and to ensure continued production of quality population statistics. The strategy includes a proposed transforming census timeline up to the 2020 election, a detailed plan (see Appendix 4) and a promise of a review report in 2025 at the earliest. The short-term focus is on modernising the current census model to create efficiencies and reduce operational costs. (pp. 5, 18, 39, 42)External
GDS30–022021 GDS Index30. Statistics New ZealandGovernment Data Strategy and Roadmap 2021Finance and Government Administration SectorAugust, 20212021–202415Chief Executive onlyData Strategy and Roadmap For New Zealand (2018)Not applicableYes, p. 26Not applicable‘[P]rovides a shared direction and plan for Aotearoa New Zealand’s government data system.’ (p. 6)The approach is to focus on four areas: investing in making the right data available; growing capability and good practice; building partnerships; and implementing open and transparent practices. The focus areas are to guide key initiatives over the next three to five years. (p. 11)Internal
GDS31–012018 GDS Index31. The TreasuryThirty Year New Zealand Infrastructure PlanFinance and Government Administration Sector
August, 20152015–204586Crown onlyNot applicableNot applicableYes, p. 9Required (see New Zealand Infrastructure Commission/ Te Waihanga Act 2019, s 12 and s 13) but not cited in the GDS (the GDS was published in 2015)‘By 2045 New Zealand’s infrastructure is resilient and coordinated and contributes to a strong economy and high living standards.’ (p. 11)The approach is to focus on developing a better understanding of the type and nature of services to deliver in the future, improving the management of existing assets, and ensuring the right settings are in place to make better investment decisions in the future. (p. 46)External
GDS31–032021 GDS Index31. The TreasuryHe Tirohanga Mokopuna 2021 – Combined Statement on the Long-term Fiscal Position and Long-term Insights BriefingFinance and Government Administration SectorSeptember, 20212021–206193Chief Executive onlyHe Tirohanga Mokopuna – 2016 Statement on the Long-term Fiscal Position (2016)Not applicableNot foundRequired (see Public Finance Act 1989, s 26I) and cited in the GDS‘[A]nalyse key trends and their potential long-term fiscal impacts directly alongside a range of policy options available to address them.’ (p. 4)The approach is not to make policy recommendations on the ‘optimal’ policy option or package of options required to manage NZ’s fiscal sustainability challenge, but to share this information for consideration and analysis by future governments. (p. 41)External
GDS02-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationKarst management guidelines – Policies and ActionsEnvironment SectorMay, 19991999–NK28
GDS02-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationWilding Conifer Management Strategy 2015–2030Environment SectorDecember, 20142015–203040
GDS02-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationKiwi Recovery Plan 2018–2028 – Mahere Whakaora Kiwi 2018–2028Environment SectorNovember, 20182018–202864
GDS02-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationRMA and EEZA Advocacy StrategyEnvironment SectorJune, 20192019–NK11
GDS02-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationDepartment of Conservation climate change adaptation action plan – Te Papa Atawhai he whakamahere hātepe urutau mō te huringa āhuarangiEnvironment SectorJune, 20202020–202480
GDS02-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationProcurement Strategy for Roading Activities, 2021/22 – 2023/24Environment SectorMay, 20222021–202419
GDS02-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationA structured decision-making approach for the recovery of kuaka /Whenua Hou diving petrel (Pelecanoides whenuahouensis)Environment SectorJune, 20222022–205045
GDS02-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index02. Department of ConservationNgā Awa, DOC’s priority river restoration programmeEnvironment Sector[[?]][[?]]4
GDS03-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index03. Department of CorrectionsTe Aorerekura – The National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual ViolenceJustice Sector
December, 20212021–202678
GDS03-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index03. Department of CorrectionsDisability Action Plan 2023–2027Justice Sector
[[?]]2023–202724
GDS03-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index03. Department of CorrectionsAra Poutama Aotearoa – Suicide Prevention and Postvention Action Plan 2022–2025Justice Sector
[[?]]2022–202520
GDS03-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index03. Department of CorrectionsAgeing Well Action Plan 2023 – 2026Justice Sector
[[?]]2023–202620
GDS04-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsAnti-Money Laundering and Countering Financing of Terrorism Group FrameworkFinance and Government Administration SectorFebruary, 20202020–NK1
GDS04-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsDIA’s Approach to Regulation of Anti-Money Laundering and Countering Financing of Terrorism – 2022Finance and Government Administration SectorJuly, 20222022–NK13
GDS04-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsTe Rautaki Matihiko mō Aotearoa – The Digital Strategy for AotearoaFinance and Government Administration SectorSeptember, 20222022–203251
GDS04-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index04. Department of Internal Affairs2022/23 Action Plan for the Digital Strategy for AotearoaFinance and Government Administration SectorSeptember, 20222022–202716
GDS04-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsFormer Refugees, Recent Migrants and Ethnic Communities Employment Action PlanFinance and Government Administration Sector[[?]][[?]]60
GDS04-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index04. Department of Internal AffairsStrategy 2022–2025 – A pathway to an Aotearoa where ethnic communities feel at home.Finance and Government Administration Sector[[?]]2022–202529
GDS05-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index05. Department of the Prime Minister and CabinetCountering Terrorism and Violent Extremism StrategyFinance and Government Administration Sector
June, 20212021–NK15
GDS05-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index05. Department of the Prime Minister and CabinetSecure Together – Tō Tātou Korowai ManaakiFinance and Government Administration Sector
August, 20232023–2028
44
GDS08-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index08. Inland Revenue DepartmentOur StrategyFinance and Government Administration Sector
October, 2023
2023–NK
2
GDS09-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index09. Land Information New ZealandWilding Conifer Management Strategy 2015–2030Primary SectorDecember, 2014
2015–2030
40
GDS09-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index09. Land Information New ZealandNew Zealand Geographic Board – Te rautaki | Strategy 2020-2025Primary SectorApril, 2020
2020–2025
2
GDS10-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index10. Ministry for Culture and HeritagePacific languages government action plan[[?]]June, 2023
2022–2032
13
GDS11-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index11. Ministry for Pacific PeoplesPacific employment action plan[[?]]May, 2022
2022–NK
32
GDS11-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index11. Ministry for Pacific PeoplesPacific languages strategy[[?]]August, 20222022–2032100
GDS11-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index11. Ministry for Pacific PeoplesPacific wellbeing strategy – Weaving all-of-government – Progressing lalanga fou[[?]]September, 2022
2022–NK
43
GDS11-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index11. Ministry for Pacific PeoplesFale mo Aiga – Pacific Housing Strategy 2030 (and Fale mo Aiga – Pacific Housing Action Plan 2030)[[?]]November, 2022
2022–2030
[[?]]
GDS11-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index11. Ministry for Pacific PeoplesPacific languages government action plan[[?]]June, 2023
2022–2032
13
GDS12-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary Industriesdeepwater strategyPrimary SectorAugust, 2017
2017–NK
1
GDS12-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesNational Fisheries Plan for Highly Migratory Species 2019Primary SectorMay, 2019[[?]][[?]]
GDS12-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesFit for a Better World – Accelerating our economic potentialPrimary SectorJuly, 2020[[?]][[?]]
GDS12-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesA Strategy for New Zealand Food Safety – Strategy Refresh 2022 – 2024Primary SectorAugust, 2022
2022–2024
[[?]]
GDS12-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesNational Inshore Finfish Fisheries PlanPrimary SectorOctober, 2022[[?]]
[[?]]
GDS12-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesWallaby Strategy –Achieving a wallaby-free AotearoaPrimary SectorOctober, 2022[[?]]
[[?]]
GDS12-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index12. Ministry for Primary IndustriesHauraki Gulf Fisheries PlanPrimary SectorAugust, 2023
2023–2028
30
GDS13-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentTe hau mārohi ki anamata – Towards a productive, sustainable and inclusive economy: Aotearoa New Zealand's first emissions reduction planEnvironment SectorMay, 2022
2022–2050
348
GDS13-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentUrutau, ka taurikura: Kia tū pakari a Aotearoa i ngā huringa āhuarangi – Adapt and thrive: Building a climate-resilient New ZealandEnvironment SectorAugust, 2022
2022–2028
196
GDS13-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentGender and ethnic pay gaps action planEnvironment SectorNovember, 2022
2022–2024
25
GDS13-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentUpdated National Implementation Plan Under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic PollutantsEnvironment SectorDecember, 2022
2022–NK
88
GDS13-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentTe rautaki para – Waste strategyEnvironment SectorMarch, 2023
2023–205056
GDS13-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentNationally Determined Contribution StrategyEnvironment SectorOctober, 2023
[[?]]
35
GDS13-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index13. Ministry for the EnvironmentSustainability Strategy July 2022 – June 2025Environment Sector[[?]]
2022–2025
2
GDS14-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index14. Ministry for WomenTe Mahere Whai Mahi – Wāhine Women’s Employment Action Plan[[?]]June, 2022
2022–NK
76
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentEmployment StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure Sector[[?]]
2019–NK
4
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentTe Mahere Whai Mahi Māori – The Māori employment action planEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorFebruary, 2022
2022–NK
56
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentAdvanced Manufacturing Industry Transformation PlanEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorMarch, 20232023–2026
84
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentHe Mahere Tiaki Kaimahi – Better Work Action PlanEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorMarch, 20232022–2025
66
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentMBIE’s Regulatory Systems Stewardship Strategy 2023–2028Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorMarch, 2023
2023–2028
36
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentDigital Technologies Industry Transformation PlanEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorMay, 2023
[[?]]
40
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentAgritech Industry Transformation PlanEconomic Development and Infrastructure SectorJune, 2023
2023–2030
28
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentAerospace Strategy 2023-2030 – Te Rautaki Ātea-ā-rangi o Aotearoa 2023-2030Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorJuly, 2023
2023–2030
19
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentCharging Our Future: National electric vehicle charging strategy for Aotearoa New Zealand 2023-2035Economic Development and Infrastructure SectorOctober, 2023
2023–2035
20
GDS15-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index15. Ministry of Business, Innovation and EmploymentOur Economic PlanEconomic Development and Infrastructure Sector[[?]]
NK
16
GDS16-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index16. Ministry of DefenceDefence Policy and Strategy Statement 2023External SectorAugust, 2023
2023–NK
36
GDS16-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index16. Ministry of DefenceFuture Force Design Principles 2023External SectorAugust, 2023
2023–2038
12
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationTe Rautaki Rawa Kura – The School Property Strategy 2030Education and Workforce SectorJune, 2020
2020–2030
48
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationTe Aorerekura –
The National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence
Education and Workforce SectorDecember, 2021
2021–2026
78
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationLiteracy & Communication and Maths StrategyEducation and Workforce SectorMarch, 2022
2022–NK
36
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationAttendance and Engagement StrategyEducation and Workforce SectorJune, 2022
2022–2026
16
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationHei raukura mō te mokopuna – A Te Reo Matatini and Pāngarau StrategyEducation and Workforce SectorAugust, 2022
2022–NK
24
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationInternational Education Strategy 2022 – 2030Education and Workforce SectorAugust, 2022
2022–2030
19
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationConnected Ako: Digital and Data for LearningEducation and Workforce SectorJune, 2023
2023–2033
64
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationPacific languages government action planEducation and Workforce SectorJune, 2023
2022–2032
13
GDS17-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index17. Ministry of EducationAction Plan for Pacific Education 2020–2030 – 2023 RefreshEducation and Workforce SectorJuly, 2023
2020–2030
88
GDS18-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradeInternational Climate Finance Strategy – Tuia te Waka a KiwaExternal Sector
August, 2022
2022–2025
19
GDS18-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index18. Ministry of Foreign Affairs and TradePacific languages government action planExternal Sector
June, 2023
2022–2032
13
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthStrategy to Prevent and Minimise Gambling Harm 2022/23 to 2024/25Health SectorJune, 2022
2022–2025
99
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthNational HIV action plan for Aotearoa New Zealand 2023–2030Health SectorMarch, 2023
2023–2030
44
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthSexually Transmitted and Blood Borne Infection Strategy 2023–2030Health SectorMarch, 2023
2023–2030
44
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthHealth Workforce Strategic FrameworkHealth SectorJuly, 2023
2023–NK
2
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthHealth Strategy 2023Health SectorJuly, 2023
2023–2033
116
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthPae Tū: Hauora
Māori Strategy
Health SectorJuly, 2023
2023–2025
76
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthProvisional Health of Disabled People StrategyHealth SectorJuly, 2023
2023–2033
62
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthTe Mana Ola – The Pacific Health StrategyHealth SectorJuly, 2023
2023–2033
79
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthRural Health Strategy 2023Health SectorJuly, 2023
2023–2033
100
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthWomen’s Health Strategy 2023Health SectorJuly, 2023
2023–2033
100
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthStrategic Framework for Managing COVID-19Health SectorSeptember, 2023
2023–NK
30
GDS19-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index19. Ministry of HealthTe Aorerekura –
The National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence
Health SectorDecember, 2021
2021–2026
78
GDS20-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index20. Ministry of Housing and Urban DevelopmentMAIHI Ka Ora –
The National Māori Housing Strategy
Social Services and Community SectorMarch, 2022
2022–2052
46
GDS20-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index20. Ministry of Housing and Urban DevelopmentFale mo Aiga – Pacific Housing Strategy 2030 (and Fale mo Aiga – Pacific Housing Action Plan 2030)Social Services and Community SectorNovember, 2022
2022–2030
[[?]]
GDS21-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index21. Ministry of JusticeTe Aorerekura –
The National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence
Justice SectorDecember, 2021
2021–2026
78
GDS22-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index22. Ministry of Māori Development—Te Puni KōkiriTe Aorerekura –
The National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence
Māori Affairs Sector
December, 2021
2021–2026
78
GDS22-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index22. Ministry of Māori Development—Te Puni KōkiriMAIHI Ka Ora –
The National Māori Housing Strategy
Māori Affairs Sector
March, 2022
[[?]]46
GDS23-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentTe Aorerekura –
The National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence
Social Services and Community SectorDecember, 2021
2021–2026
78
GDS23-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentFinancial Capability in Aotearoa New Zealand 2021-2024Social Services and Community Sector2021
2021–2024
24
GDS23-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentTā Te Manatū Whakahiato Ora Rautaki Hangarau MSD’s Technology StrategySocial Services and Community SectorMarch, 2022
2022–NK
27
GDS23-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentOlder Workers Employment Action Plan – He Mahere Mahi Whakawhiwhi Mahi mō te Hunga PakekeSocial Services and Community SectorApril, 2022
2022–NK
24
GDS23-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentEmployment and Social Outcomes Investment Strategy 2022 - 2025Social Services and Community SectorJune, 2022
2022–2025
78
GDS23-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentSocial Sector Commissioning 2022–2028 Action PlanSocial Services and Community SectorOctober, 2022
2022–2028
44
GDS23-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentYouth Plan: Voice, Leadership, Action (made up of (i) Strategic Framework, (ii) Rolling Suite of Actions, and (iii) Measurement Framework)Social Services and Community SectorAugust, 2023
2023–2028
43 (combined)
GDS23-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index23. Ministry of Social DevelopmentFormer Refugees, Recent Migrants and Ethnic Communities Employment Action PlanSocial Services and Community Sector[[?]][[?]]60
GDS24-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportInternational Air Transport PolicyEconomic Development and Infrastructure Sector
May, 2012
2012–NK
30
GDS24-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportTe Rautaki Whai-Taunakitanga
Waka a Aotearoa –
The New Zealand Transport Evidence Base Strategy
Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
October, 2022
2021–2024
20
GDS24-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportMahere Hohenga kia Whakakorea te Waro ā-Kawenga 2022-25 – Decarbonising Transport Action Plan 2022–25Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
December, 2022
2022–2025
134
GDS24-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportFreight and Supply Chain StrategyEconomic Development and Infrastructure Sector
August, 2023
2023–2033
62
GDS24-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportSearch and Rescue Strategic Plan 2021-2024Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
August, 2023
2023–2033
62
GDS24-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index24. Ministry of TransportCharging Our Future: National electric vehicle charging strategy for Aotearoa New Zealand 2023-2035Economic Development and Infrastructure Sector
October, 2023
2023–2035
20
GDS25-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index25. New Zealand Customs ServiceInclusion and diversity strategy and plan 2023-2026 External SectorJune, 2023
2023–2026
20
GDS25-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index25. New Zealand Customs ServiceRautaki Mana Ārai – Customs Strategy 2023-2028External Sector2023
2023–2028
24
GDS27-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index27. Oranga Tamariki – Ministry for ChildrenTe Aorerekura –
The National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence
Social Services and Community SectorDecember, 2021
2021–2026
78
GDS27-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index27. Oranga Tamariki – Ministry for ChildrenOranga Tamariki Action Plan (and Implementing the Oranga Tamariki Action Plan)Social Services and Community Sector[[?]]2022–2023
17 (combined)
GDS27-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index27. Oranga Tamariki – Ministry for ChildrenSocial Sector Commissioning 2022–2028 Action PlanSocial Services and Community SectorOctober, 2022
2022–2028
44
GDS28-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index28. Public Service
Commission
Te Aorerekura –
The National Strategy to Eliminate Family Violence and Sexual Violence
Social Services and Community SectorDecember, 2021
2021–2026
78
GDS28-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index28. Public Service
Commission
Fourth National
Action Plan
Social Services and Community SectorDecember, 2022
2023–2024
33
GDS28-[[XX]]2023 GDS Index28. Public Service
Commission
Te Rautaki Ārahi i te Ratonga Tūmatanui o Aotearoa – The Leadership Strategy for New Zealand’s Public ServiceSocial Services and Community SectorJuly, 2023
2023–NK
24